Wednesday, March 13, 2019

THE BLAST FROM THE 70'S IN PICTURES

In case you didn't believe what I posted about my summer of 1978 seminarian experience at St. Joseph Church in Macon, Georgia, here is visual proof and yes, a picture is worth a thousand words but perhaps too many words in pictures for this topic, no?

As an interesting aside, Pope Saint Paul VI died that summer of '78 while I was at St. Joseph's, about a week after the publication of this newsletter, on August 6, 1978.

As another interesting aside, Pope John Paul I, currently slighted as not having been canonized or beatified, was elected pope as I was driving back to St. Mary's Seminary in Baltimore to begin my third year of theology. 



4 comments:

TJM said...

Father McDonald,

The fact that you were wearing clericals then made you a standout and shows you were probably a closet conservative at the time!!!

I am very pleased that many of the young priests associated with the University of Notre Dame, the Congregation of Holy Cross, are back to wearing the religious habit of the order. The old boys, though, are hopelessly mired in the 1960s and 1970s, and prefer the sloppy look.

qwikness said...

Whatever happened to Father Bob?

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

Fr. Bob is pastor in Waycross. Fr. Ben left the priesthood to marry in the late 80's I think.

John Nolan said...

In the late 1970s I was spared all this lunacy. In the glovebox of my car I carried two vade mecums - the Good Beer Guide published by CAMRA (the Campaign for Real Ale) and the Latin Mass Directory. Both were under threat at this time from bland meretricious products.

In 1978 I attended the Easter Vigil for the first time at the London Oratory. It blew my socks off. Since then my enthusiasm for real liturgy and real ale are undiminished. The latter is now universally available and the former is much easier to find.

A few years ago I was in Regensburg. After High Mass at the Cathedral we sat in a beer garden facing that marvellous Gothic edifice. I remembered Browning's lines 'God's in his heaven - All's right with the world!'

Fortunately, not in the context of the original poem.