Friday, September 21, 2018

MIRACLE EAR MUST HAVE CURED HIS EMINENCE'S TONE DEAFNESS

Interesting, no?

Cardinal Tobin Not Attending XV Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops: Holy Father Grants Request to Remain with People of Newark at Time of Crisis

September 21, 2018
 
Cardinal Joseph W. Tobin, C.Ss.R., Archbishop of Newark, today advised the people of the Archdiocese that he will not attend the XV Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, set to begin in Rome on Oct. 2 and conclude at the end of the month. Earlier this year, Pope Francis had requested the Cardinal’s attendance at this important event in the life of the Church.

In a letter to the people of Newark, the Cardinal stated: “This Synod is a uniquely important moment in the life of the Church, and I was honored to have been named by the Holy Father as a member of this special gathering whose topic, Young People, Faith and Vocational Discernment, is of vital concern to the Church today and in the future.

“However, as you are aware,” he continued, “the Archdiocese of Newark suffers greatly as a result of the crisis that continues to unfold. After the revelations of the past summer, I could not see myself absent for a month from our archdiocese and from you, the people entrusted to my care. After prayer and consultation, I wrote to Pope Francis, asking that he dispense me from attending, but assuring him that I strongly support the objectives of the Synod and that I would obey whatever he decided.”

He further stated: “The Holy Father responded the next day with a beautiful pastoral and compassionate message. He told me that he understands why I need to stay close to home, and he released me from the obligation to attend the Synod next month.”

The text of the Cardinal’s letter follows:

Brothers and Sisters in Christ,
I am writing to share with you my decision not to attend the XV Ordinary General Assembly of the 
Synod of Bishops, which begins in Rome on October 2 and concludes the end of the month.

This Synod is a uniquely important moment in the life of the Church, and I was honored to have been named by the Holy Father as a member of this special gathering whose topic, Young People, Faith and Vocational Discernment, is of vital concern to the Church today and in the future. 

However, as you are aware, the Archdiocese of Newark suffers greatly as a result of the crisis that continues to unfold. After the revelations of the past summer, I could not see myself absent for a month from our archdiocese and from you, the people entrusted to my care. After prayer and consultation, I wrote to Pope Francis, asking that he dispense me from attending, but assuring him that I strongly support the objectives of the Synod and that I would obey whatever he decided.

The Holy Father responded the next day with a beautiful pastoral and compassionate message. He told me that he understands why I need to stay close to home, and he released me from the obligation to attend the Synod next month.

I am deeply grateful to Pope Francis for his pastoral care for me and for the people of our Archdiocese. My commitment to him—and to all of you—is to use the month of October to attend to all dimensions of the crisis we face. 

On September 14, 2018, Behold the Wood of the Cross: A Service of Prayer, Recognition and Hope was held in the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart. During this solemn moment in the life of our archdiocese, I promised that we will act decisively to address the sins and injustices that have been committed against our most vulnerable sisters and brothers and to ensure that victims receive justice. I also acknowledged that rebuilding trust in the leadership of our Church at all levels will require authentic and measurable change. 

I am keenly aware that words alone are not enough. We must show by our actions that justice will be done. Never again will we permit the horrific abuses that occurred here and in too many other places in our Church. Never again will we return to “business as usual,” allowing human wickedness, sin or hypocrisy to blind us from the truth or prevent us from doing God’s work.

During the month of October, and throughout the months and years ahead, I will do everything in my power to lead this Archdiocese through processes of renewal and change that break down structures and systems that permit or foster abuse in any form. I will work for justice, healing and compassion for all.

Please pray for Pope Francis and for the success of the XV General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops as it discusses the topic of Young People, Faith and Vocational Discernment. Please also pray for me that, with the help of God’s grace, I can do my part to help restore confidence in the leadership of our Church. 

May the Mother of Jesus, the Mother of the Church, our Mother, intercede for us always and lead us to the Cross of Christ, our only hope.

Sincerely yours in Christ,

 Joseph Cardinal W. Tobin, C.Ss.R.
Archbishop of Newark

POPE BENEDICT IS ONE SHARP EMERITUS!

In this manner [my] pontificate is being devalued and fused into a sadness about the situation (pontificate?) of the Church today.


THIS IS ONE SHARP POPE!

UPDATE: Sept. 21: Here below are the full texts of the two letters Benedict XVI sent to Cardinal Brandmüller, on Nov 9, and Nov. 23, 2017 (Register translations). 
His Eminence
Most Reverend
Cardinal Walter Brandmüller
President Emeritus of the Pontifical Historical Commission
Palazzo della Canonica
00120 Vatican City

Vatican City, 9 November 2017

Your Eminence,
In your recent interview with the FAZ [Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung] you say that I created, with the construction of the Pope Emeritus, a figure that does not exist in the entirety of Church history. Of course, you know very well that popes have retired, even if very rarely. What were they afterwards? Pope Emeritus? Or what instead?
As you know, Pius XII left instructions in case of being captured by the Nazis: that from the moment of his capture he would no longer be Pope but a Cardinal again. Whether this simple return to the Cardinalate would have been in fact possible, we do not know.  In my case it surely would not have made sense simply to claim a return to the Cardinalate. I then would have constantly been exposed to the public in the way a Cardinal is – indeed, even more so, because in that Cardinal one would have seen the former Pope. This could have led, intentionally or unintentionally, to difficult consequences, particularly in the context of the present situation.
With the Papa Emeritus I have tried to create a situation in which I am absolutely inaccessible to the media and in which it is completely clear that there is only one Pope. If you know of a better way and thus believe that you may condemn the one I have chosen, please tell me about it.
I greet you in the Lord
Your Benedict XVI

***

His Eminence
Most Reverend Cardinal Walter BrandmüllerPresident Emeritus of the Pontifical Historical Commission
Palazzo della Canonica
00120 Vatican City

Vatican City, 23 November 2017

Your Eminence,
From your kind letter of November 15th I assume I may conclude that in the future you no longer want to comment publicly on the question of my resignation, and for this I thank you.
The deep-seated pain that the end of my pontificate has caused in you, as in many others, I can understand very well. But the pain in some — and it seems to me also in you — has turned into anger, which no longer regards only the resignation, but increasingly is expanding to my person and to my pontificate as a whole.  In this manner [my] pontificate is being devalued and fused into a sadness about the situation of the Church today.
From this fusion a new kind of agitation gradually results, for which the little book by Fabrizio Grasso, La rinuncia (Algra Editore, Viagrande/Catania 2017) could become emblematic.
All this fills me with worry and, precisely for that reason, the end of your FAZ interview left me so troubled, because it ultimately cannot but foster the same sort of atmosphere.
Let us pray instead, as you did at the end of your letter, that the Lord may come to the aid of his Church. With my Apostolic blessing I am

Your
Benedict XVI

OH WAIT! I THINK I KNOW WHAT THE CAUSE OF THE ON-GOING MELTDOWN IN THE CHURCH IS: LOSS OF CATHOLIC IDENTITY TOUCHING ALL MEMBERS OF THE CHURCH, LAITY, CLERGY AND RELIGIOUS TO INCLUDE THE MAGISTERIUM


Below this post I quote Benedictine Sister Joan Chitister of Erie, PA. She is a dinosaur, still living though, of the 1960's revolution that abandoned the Catholicism of the pre-Vatican II Church for the mushy version they desired.

This led to the loss of Catholic identity of Bishops, priests and men and women religious all of whom were formed in the stricter version and strongly Catholic Church prior to Vatican II.

Once former constraints on individualism and doing your own thing were removed, they lived their lost Catholic identity with reckless abandon. Just a few years after the Council, many clergy and religious left their promises and/or vows of celibate chastity for the married life. Homosexuals who did not have the option of civil marriages or laicization that could lead to a Church marriage stayed but lived life with reckless abandon now that Vatican II spirit removed the shackles of constraint on their disordered affections.

All you have to do is to read the so-called moral theologians of the 1970's, like Fr. Charles Curran and others to know that they were enablers helping those who had disordered affections to get around traditional, manualist moral theology.

The loss of Catholic identity was shoved down the throats of unsuspecting laity by these revolutionaries and their libertine notion of Catholicism in the post-Vatican II era, a new Church in complete rupture with the past.

Some laity loved the new direction of liberalism and individualism and soon did their own thing which led many of them away from even the liberal expressions of Catholicism.

Thus we have a smaller, less faithful Church today and we are reaping the fruits of immature clergy and religious who abused their vows and promises not only with consenting adults, but with vulnerable adults, teenagers and in extreme cases pedophilia with small children.

So much of this loss of identity was explicitly symbolized in the various abuses of the new order of the Mass, such as the photo of the priest dressed as a clown with children around him in 1984!  The complete abuse of the Vatican II liturgy coupled with the abuse of minors and vulnerable adults can certainly be linked one to the other in terms of the narcissistic personality of priests and religious. 

Thus infidelity and loss of Catholic identity promoted as what Vatican II taught is the height of clericalism and the lies that have led us to where we are today! 

A LIBERAL DESCONTRUCTIONIST OF WOMEN'S RELIGIOUS LIFE, SISTER JOAN CHITTISTER IS THE PROBLEM NOT THE SOLUTION ALTHOUGH SHE MAKES SOME GOOD POINTS


Liberal women's religious orders are about to send their last person out the door with instructions to turn out the lights when they leave. Sister Joan, a Benedictine, and a pioneer of the destruction of women's religious life is no one to lecture Catholics on how to survive the current scandals we are experiencing.

She has been spewing her version of Catholicism, which is truly heretical, since I started reading the NCR in the seminary in the 1970's. Like Cardinal Kasper and others their age, they just keep giving and giving and giving! 

But with that said, she makes some good points in a National Chismatic Reporter (NCR) article she penned.

I have to agree with Sister Joan on these points all of which continue a bit of truth:

In the midst of the angst that has accompanied the revelation of unparalleled amounts of sexual abuse of children in the Catholic Church, the cry for reform gets louder by the day.
For some, it's a call for the elimination of celibacy as an unnatural and therefore impossible way of life. For others, it's about barring homosexuals from the priesthood, as if homosexuality was in essence a model of immorality rather than simply another state of nature — just like heterosexuality with its own immoral aberrations. For many, it's about a lack of psychosocial development in seminaries; for others, it's about the liberalization of the church since the Second Vatican Council, no matter that the bulk of assaults happened, apparently, before the end of the council.

But then she goes off the rails, or remains on her rails of deconstruction and destruction that has led religious life of liberal women to the brink of extinction with the following 1960's ideologies  she is so well-known for. I have to wonder if there aren't any modern Catholic women, who were her age in the 1960's who could espouse something that would help the Church rather than destroy it: 

Francis is painfully clear about one such root of it — the scourge of clericalism that creates a caste system in Catholic Christianity.

Clerics make up less than 1 percent of the church. But clericalism makes its clerics superior to the rest of the church in power, the presumption of holiness, absolute parochial authority and as the keepers of accountability. It moves clerics light years away from the Jesus who "did not see being equal to God a thing to be clung to." It moves the rest of us to talk about being "the people of God" — as if we knew we were — but then fail to call the clerical church to public discussion of great theological "truths."


What Francis' statement fails to unmask, however, is the second issue that must be addressed: The fact is that clericalism touched more than the clergy. It was Catholic police, lawyers, staff, even parents who shielded pedophiles by refusing to make complaints, listen to children, or rip away the secrecy that shielded them. It says that the theology of the church itself must be retaught. It says that the rest of the church itself must grow up to be equal to the Christianization of the church itself.


A third dimension of the problem is certainly the theology of obedience that derives, of course, from our definition of church and the role of the clergy but affects the personal lives of Catholics in a particularly insidious way. It turns obedience in the church — a commitment to "listening to the Spirit" — into blind obedience, a kind of military code attached to a series of clerical commanding officers.


As a result, 100 percent of the decisions, the discernment and the moral perspectives of the laity are simply ignored. National conferences of bishops, dioceses and parish priests — the clerical 1 percent of the church — all stumble along laying down laws developed by few but heralded by the clergy alone.


Pope Paul VI toyed with the notion of clergy/lay consultation on the birth control question — certainly a question for the sacrament of marriage if ever I saw one. But then, at the end, under pressure from Cardinal Karol Wojtyla, who would later himself become Pope John Paul II, Paul VI rejected the advice of some of the strongest Catholic lay couples on the globe and declared birth control legislation binding. And we know where that got them.


And finally, under it all, the fourth necessary element of reform lies in the theology of priesthood that insists that the ontology of the human being is changed by priestly ordination. Translation: a priest is not like other human beings. Ordination gives them a special mark, an eternal one. Then, out of that reasoning, they connect their special character, their special place in the church, their special authority, their special holiness.


To be honest with you, I have never met anybody who wasn't special in a special way. To reserve that for priesthood obviously distorts the character of the rest of the church. As it has.

From where I stand, it seems to me that what we wind up with is a sin against adult conscience and the infantilization of the laity. What we finally wind up with are questions of church, clericalism, obedience and human ontology unanswered and unaddressed.


What we wind up with is a church still living in the last century while pretending to have answers to the questions of this one. But that's just what they did in the 16th century when Martin Luther wanted to talk about celibacy, the sale of relics, and publishing the Bible in the vernacular so that everybody, not just the clergy, could read it.


The truth is that real reform depends on the teachings of the church. Not simply on a change of structures.


As the song says, "When will they ever learn?" (NO SISTER, THE QUESTION IS WHEN WILL YOU LEARN?)

[Joan Chittister is a Benedictine sister of Erie, Pennsylvania.]

My final comment: The way out the scandals of the Church caused by the heterodox theologies of the 1960's and 70's isn't more of the same. Retire Sister Joan to her monastery to remain silent. Let's hear from orthodox women, who are young, who can lead the way out of this mess. Sister Joan isn't the one to do it, nor Cardinal Kasper or anyone their ages or older. 

THE GERMAN NEWSPAPER “BILD” HAS MORE OF A LETTER SENT TO POPE BENEDICT AND MORE QUESTIONS

Below the letter is a google translation of this morning’s “Bild” article. What do you think?

Ein Brief von Papst Benedikt an Kardinal Walter Brandmüller
A tempestaround the secret letters, the Pope Benedict XVI. four years after his resignation to the German Cardinal Walter Brandmüller (89) sent. Yesterday BILD published the historically significant correspondence for the first time. Since then it has been puzzled: what message did Benedict want to send in his letters?

With his letters dated 9 and 23 November 2017 to Cardinal Brandmüller, Benedikt initially decisively rejected his allegations that he had caused "serious damage" to the Church by resigning.

In his letter, Benedict referred in this context also to Pope Pius XII, who feared a "Nazi arrest" in 1944 and had therefore formulated plans for resignation.

This passage in Benedict's letter triggered different interpretations in church circles. Also about the real reasons for his resignation.

Professor Thomas Sternberg, President of the Central Committee of German Catholics, is convinced that "in the Vatican, there are dramatic resistances not only against Pope Francis but also against his predecessor."

JOHN ALLEN OF CRUX, DON’T CALL IT STUBBORNNESS; CALL IT CLERICALISM

This pope has the knack of calling out others for the things that compose his personality.  Some Preachers have a psychological flaw of protesting those things they are most guilty. Think Jimmy Swaggert.

But clericalism is the explanation for what John Allen calls stubbornness. You can read the article by pressing the title:

Alongside Francis the Simple, there’s also Francis the Stubborn

Thursday, September 20, 2018

THIS IS FROM THE GERMAN PUBLICATION “BILD” WHO BROKE THE NEWS OF THE LETTERS AND APPARENTLY HAS THE LEAKED LETTERS—DID POPE BENEDICT FEAR BEING POISONED?

Five years ago, Pope Benedict XVI (91) resigned.
The abuse scandal sheds a new light on this surprising step. Now shocking letters written by the retired Pope have surfaced that will be highly interesting to church historians.
The letters – which are available to BILD – show that Benedict XVI is deeply concerned about the state of the Church.

The correspondence goes back to November 2017. The letters are addressed to a German cardinal. In an interview, the cardinal had made critical remarks about Benedict’s stepping down.

Controversial letters: Pope Benedict XVI concerned about his Church
His main criticism was that the Church had allegedly entered a major crisis because of the Pope’s resignation. Moreover, a resignation by a Pope was unprecedented
in Church history and had done serious harm to the Church.
The retired Pope reacted with an angry letter. To the cardinal who had criticized him, he wrote: “I can very well understand the deep-seated pain that the end of my papacy has inflicted on you and many others. However, for some people and – it seems to me – also for you, the pain has turned into an anger that no longer merely concerns my resignation, but increasingly also my person and my papacy as a whole.

By this, a papacy itself is now being devalued and melted into the sorrow about the situation in which the Church currently finds itself.” He severely reprimanded the cardinal: “If you know a better way (referring to the resignation, ed.) and therefore think that you can judge the one chosen by me, please tell me."

There had indeed been papal resignations in the past, Benedict wrote. One example was Pope Pius XII (1876-1958) who, in 1944, aimed to avoid being “arrested by the Nazis” by stepping down. What is interesting is the comparison to a Pope threatened by the Nazis. Who did Benedict feel threatened by?
„Pray for me that I may not flee for fear of the wolves,“ Benedict XVI said at his inauguration. Who are the wolves?
Professor of Philosophy and Vatican expert, Armin Schwibach (53), told BILD:

„By ‘the wolves’, he probably meant the network of high-ranking Church dignitaries who have created a system of power, and abuse of power, in the Vatican, and whom he felt unable to cope with.”
Was Benedict even concerned about being poisoned by henchmen of this network? The „Spiegel“ reported in May 2015 that, in October 2012, the president of the Bavarian State Office of Criminal Investigations allegedly travelled to Rome to review gaps in the food preparation for the Pope. Even more interesting: When, given the bewildered state of the Church following the Pope’s resignation, the cardinal criticized by the Pope wrote back: “May the Lord help his Church”, Benedict replied once more – and with a remarkable sentence.
He wrote: „Let us rather pray, as you did at the end of your letter, that the Lord will come to the aid of his Church.” So did the former Pope think that the Church had entered a crisis under his successor, and that only praying would help in this crisis?


Excerpt from the letter to the cardinal from November 2017, signed “Benedict XVI”
Excerpt from the letter to the cardinal from November 2017, signed “Benedict XVI”
Benedict’s successor, Pope Francis, is currently facing accusations of having supported a powerful US cardinal despite knowing that Benedict had punished him for sexual offences.
The editor-in-chief of the Katholische Nachrichtenagentur (Catholic News Agency, KNA), Ludwig Ring Eifel (58), told BILD: „The letters allow for fascinating insights into Benedict XVI’s thinking – he is obviously very concerned about the state of the Church.“ Benedict’s private secretary, Arch Bishop Georg Gänswein (62), did not want to comment on the letters to BILD. He recently chose to compare the situation of the Church – shaken by abuse scandals and systematic cover-ups – to the terror attacks of September 11 in New York. The Church, he said, is currently experiencing “its own 9/11”.

ARE HIS HOLINESS' DAILY HOMILIES SIGNS OF PASSIVE AGRESSIVENESS OR ACTIVE AGRESSIVENESS OR SIMPLY DESPERATION?


“Hypocrites are the devil’s instrument for destroying the Church”

In Santa Marta Francis admonishes those who “scandalize” before the sins of others for they “believe they have been saved thanks to their own external merits”. “Jesus forgives and uses mercy, let’s not forget that when we badmouth others”

“But look, what a scandal! You can’t live like that! We have lost our values... Now everyone has the right to enter the church, even divorced people, everyone? But where are we?”. In the past or in the present many have been the “just” and “pure” people who have pronounced such phrases inside and outside the Church. Francis gives a name to these criticisms and public denunciations: “the scandal of the hypocrites”, he says in today’s mass in Santa Marta. It is “the hypocrisy of those who believe themselves saved for their own external merits”.

Jesus himself shows a very harsh attitude towards these people who “on the outside show “everything beautiful” but are “rotten” inside. They have rottenness inside”. Christ defines them, “Whitewashed tombs”. And Francis adds more: “As the Church walks through history, she is persecuted by hypocrites: hypocrites from inside and from outside. The devil has nothing to do with repentant sinners, because they look at God and say: “Lord, I am a sinner, help me”. And the devil is powerless, but he is strong with the hypocrites. He is strong, and uses them to destroy, destroy people, destroy society, destroy the Church. The devil’s workhorse is hypocrisy, because he is a liar: he shows himself as a powerful, beautiful prince, and yet he is a murderer”.

The testimony offered by Jesus is totally opposite Francis, affirms in his homily reported by Vatican News: a great, total love, which looks also at the “small gesture of good will, fostering it and carrying it forward”. As happens for example for the woman of today’s Gospel, who does not hide her condition of “sinner” but shows a great love for Christ. “Her many sins are forgiven, because she loved so much”, are the words of Jesus on which the Pope invites us to reflect. “She was forgiven so much because she loved so much”.

“But how to love? They do not know how to love”, someone object. “They seek love,” the Pope replied. “Jesus, speaking of these women - Jesus once said - that they will be before us, in the Kingdom of Heaven”. “But what a scandal... these people”, the Pharisees exclaim, who “have an attitude that only hypocrites often have: they scandalize” before other’s sins, Francis notes.

He concludes by exhorting us “not to forget that Jesus forgives, receives and uses mercy, a word that is often forgotten when we talk about others”. Like Jesus, we must “be merciful and not condemn others. [Put] Jesus at the center. Only in this way, insists the Pope, can we meet “true love”, unlike hypocrites “unable to meet love because their hearts are closed”. 


WOW AND YIKES AND BOMBSHELL: A "DEAD" POPE SPEAKS ABOUT THE PAIN HIS RESIGNATION HAS CAUSED AND THE CRISIS IT HAS CREATED AND HIS SORROW FOR IT!

From the National Catholic Register's Edward Pentin! Be warned, there are some nuclear bombs in this journalist's article as he does his job as Pope Francis asked journalists to do!

 “In this way,” Benedict adds, “[my] papacy itself is now being devalued and melted into the sorrow about the situation in which the Church currently finds itself.

My comment: I wonder if the emeritus Pope knows that he alone, with the help of the Holy Spirit, can return the Church and papacy to its true mission? He is the key! And my clairvoyance tells me that he knows it. Time will tell. 

Pope Benedict XVI in Portugal, 2010.
Pope Benedict XVI in Fatima, Portugal, 2010. ( Mazur/www.thepapalvisit.org.uk)

Benedict XVI Discusses His Resignation in Newly Published Letters

The words of the Pope Emeritus from November 2017 show he is aware of pain his resignation caused, and the sorrow people feel about the current situation facing the Church.

A German newspaper today published two letters Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI wrote last November which give a glimpse of how he views his resignation and what many see as turmoil in the Church that has followed his unexpected departure.

Bild newspaper reports that Benedict XVI wrote the letters in response to a cardinal but it doesn’t name him. 

However, The New York Times says it is Cardinal Walter Brandmüller who had just given an interview in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung critical of Benedict’s resignation. 


Cardinal Brandmüller, a former president the Pontifical Committee for Historical Sciences, had told the newspaper the “Pope Emeritus” title never existed “in all of Church history” and that Benedict’s resignation had “knocked us cardinals sideways, and not only us.”

In one of his letters of reply, the Pope Emeritus shows that he is aware of the strife the Church has faced since he resigned, but is also concerned that some of the anger and frustration is being directed at him and his pontificate.

“I can very well understand the deep-seated pain that the end of my papacy has inflicted on you and many others,” Benedict writes in a letter dated Nov. 23, 2017, according to The New York Times

“However, for some people and – it seems to me – also for you, the pain has turned into an anger that no longer merely concerns my resignation, but increasingly also my person and my papacy as a whole. 


“In this way,” Benedict adds, “a papacy itself is now being devalued and melted into the sorrow about the situation in which the Church currently finds itself.”


In the first letter, dated Nov. 9, 2017, Benedict was quite terse with the cardinal over his criticism of the title and life after resignation, reported the Times: “With ‘pope emeritus,’ I tried to create a situation in which I am absolutely not accessible to the media and in which it is completely clear that there is only one pope,” he wrote. “If you know of a better way, and believe that you can judge the one I chose, please tell me.”

Bild reported that Benedict refers in one of the letters to the Venerable Pope Pius XII and his contingency plan to step down in 1944 to avoid being “arrested by the Nazis.”

The German newspaper asked: “What did Benedict feel threatened by?” and added that a clue might be found in his words at his inauguration in 2005: “Pray for me that I may not flee for fear of the wolves.” 

Cardinal Brandmüller responded to Benedict, referring to the current confusion in the Church, by saying: “May the Lord help his Church.”

The Pope Emeritus replied in agreement: “Let us rather pray, as you did at the end of your letter, that the Lord will come to the aid of his Church.”

Benedict XVI announced his resignation on Feb. 11, 2013, and relinquished office on Feb. 28 of that year. He became the first pope to resign since Gregory XII in 1415 who did so in order to end the Western Schism, and the first to do so on his own initiative since Celestine V in 1294.

He said in his resignation speech that he had chosen to step down because he had come to “the certainty that my strengths, due to an advanced age, are no longer suited to an adequate exercise of the Petrine ministry.”

He also said that because today’s world is “subject to so many rapid changes and shaken by questions of deep relevance for the life of faith,” he believed “both strength of mind and body are necessary, strength which in the last few months, has deteriorated in me to the extent that I have had to recognize my incapacity to adequately fulfil the ministry entrusted to me.”

Cardinal Brandmüller, one of the four cardinals to submit dubia to Pope Francis questioning aspects of his apostolic exhortation Amoris Laetitia, has long been a supporter of Joseph Ratzinger, but also the most vocal critic of his decision to resign.

In 2016 he wrote an article calling for a law to define the status of the ex-pope and concluding that the resignation of the Pope “is possible, and it has been done, but it is to be hoped that it may never happen again.” An extended version of the article appeared in the periodical, The Jurist.

WOW! RICHMOND HILL, GEORGIA, SAINT ANNE CHURCH AND YOURS TRULY JUST MENTIONED ON NATIONAL CATHOLIC RADIO--THE GUS LLOYD SHOW, SEIZE THE DAY!!!!!


My rectory, believe it or not, is eight miles from St. Anne Church, so I have a bit of a commute in our rush hour morning traffic. I listen to XM's Catholic Channel and Gus Lloyd's Seize the Day at that time of morning as I am fighting all the traffic and road construction to widen Ford Avenue from two lanes to four.

He has "call-in" segments from people all over the USA and Canada. The first caller's name was "Deb!" And she spoke about her husband's conversion to the Catholic Faith after having been an Episcopalian (she is a third order Carmelite).

She said what did it for him was adoration of the Most Blessed Sacrament and making a Holy Hour each week in her parish chapel on Wednesdays. She said her parish is about to add Thursdays as well and he can't wait!

Then she said she lives in Richmond Hill, belongs to Saint Anne's and Fr. Allan was their pastor.

But Adoration is the star this morning!

OKAY, I AM FROM NAPOLI AND MY HALF ITALIAN SIDE, SOMEWHAT SUPERSTITIOUS, SEES THIS AS A KIND OF OMEN!

What do you think! By the way, St. Genaro is a good friend of mine who provided a miraculous healing for me almost 5 years ago at the waterfront in Naples.


Cardinal ‘blanches’ while celebrating recurring miracle of saint’s liquefied blood

Cardinal ‘blanches’ while celebrating recurring miracle of saint’s liquefied blood
Cardinal Crescenzio Sepe of Naples speaks with CNA in Rome, Feb. 13, 2015. (Credit: Bohumil Petrik/CNA.)
NAPLES, Italy - Cardinal Crescenzio Sepe of Naples usually does not faint at the sight of blood.
He has celebrated the miracle of the liquefaction of the blood of St. Januarius, an early martyr, many times over the years.
But this year, something caused Sepe to “blanch” and sit down during the Sept. 19 celebration of the miracle, Italian news agency ANSA reported.
While he refused to leave the altar, Sepe felt too faint to carry the phials of blood outside to show the crowds who had gathered in anticipation of the miracle, which typically occurs three times a year.
It is unknown what caused Sepe to feel ill during the celebration, though ANSA reported that it was “perhaps because of the heat.”
The blood did liquefy during the celebration, according to ANSA.
St. Januarius, or San Gennaro in Italian, is patron of Naples was a bishop of the city in the third century, whose bones and blood are preserved in the cathedral as relics. He is believed to have been martyred during Diocletian persecution.
The reputed miracle is locally known and accepted, though has not been the subject of official Church recognition. The liquefaction reportedly happens at least three times a year: Sept. 19, the saint’s feast day, the Saturday before the first Sunday of May, and Dec. 16, the anniversary of the 1631 eruption of Mount Vesuvius.
During the miracle, the dried, red-colored mass confined to one side of the reliquary becomes blood that covers the entire glass. In local lore, the failure of the blood to liquefy signals war, famine, disease or other disaster.
The blood did not liquefy in December 2016, but Monsignor Vincenzo De Gregorio, abbot of the Chapel of the Treasure of San Gennaro, said it was a sign that Catholics should pray rather than worry about what the lack of miracle could mean.
“We must not think of disasters and calamities. We are men of faith and we must pray,” he said at the time.
The vial has sometimes changed upon the visit of a pope.
On March 21, 2015, Pope Francis met with priests, religious and seminarians at the cathedral and gave a blessing with the relic.
Sepe then received the vial back from the pope and noted that the blood had partially liquefied.
The last time blood liquefied in the presence of a pope was in 1848 when Bl. Pius IX visited. The phenomenon didn’t happen when St. John Paul II visited the city in October 1979, or when Benedict XVI visited in October 2007.

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

FROM THAT GREAT ITALIAN VATICANISTA, SANDRO MAGISTER

"Quaerere Deum." Twelve Years Ago On the Dot, the September 12 of the Church of Benedict

Dreher

That “The Benedict Option” is truly “the most important religious book of the decade” - as David Brooks predicted in the “New York Times” - is now beyond a doubt, seeing how the discussion it has generated has come to involve even the highest levels of the Catholic Church.
In presenting this book last week in the chamber of deputies of the Italian republic, Archbishop Georg Gänswein, Joseph Ratzinger’s secretary before and after his resignation from the papacy, in fact did not hesitate to bring to the field the two most recent popes, because - he said - “even Benedict XVI from the moment of his resignation conceived of himself as an elderly monk who feels it his duty to dedicate himself above all to prayer for Mother Church, for his successor Francis and for the Petrine ministry instituted by Christ himself.”
Of course, the Benedict of the “option” - in the book by the American former Catholic and now Orthodox Rod Dreher - is not pope Ratzinger, but Saint Benedict of Norcia, the great monk of the fifth and sixth centuries who gave rise to a formidable rebirth of Christian faith and culture in the chaos that followed the collapse of the Roman empire. But the other Benedict, the pope, evoked precisely that rebirth in his memorable address - absolutely worth rereading - of September 12, 2008 in Paris, at the Collège des Bernardins, essentially proposing that the Catholics of today take up and bring to life again the lesson of that great Benedictine monasticism, at the present juncture of civilization:
About Pope Francis, however, it cannot be said that he finds himself in harmony with this vision, according to at least two indications.
The first is the direct attack that “La Civiltà Cattolica” carried out last January on the book by Dreher, dismissing its “option” as the heresy of a Christianity made up only of the “pure”:
It must be kept in mind that “La Civiltà Cattolica,” directed by the Jesuit Antonio Spadaro, is not just any magazine, but is printed after every one of its articles has been inspected at the Vatican, and has with the current pope a relationship of the closest symbiosis.
But then there is that other indication, which is the cold shower with which Francis has doused monasticism, with the apostolic constitution “Vultum Dei quaerere” of 2016 and with the subsequent applicational instruction “Cor orans” of 2018, undermining the material and spiritual autonomy of the monasteries and requiring them to federate under the bureaucratic command of authorities outside of themselves.
The two documents concern female monasticism, but they are the expression of a more general lack of appreciation that Francis has repeatedly shown for the contemplative life with respect to the active life, going so far as to say for example, in the exhortation "Gaudete et exsultate” on the call to holiness in the contemporary world:
"It is not healthy to love silence while fleeing interaction with others, to want peace and quiet while avoiding activity, to seek prayer while disdaining service… We are called to be contemplatives even in the midst of action."
The heavy-handedness of this attack on the contemplative life has been noted with great concern in many monasteries, to which expression has been given by the vaticanista Aldo Maria Valli in this three-part analysis, published in a few days ago:
Naturally, all is not sunny in modern-day Benedictine monasticism, especially in the men's communities, which are marked here and there by lapses and degeneracies that are in some cases quite serious. But Dreher’s proposal, and even more authoritatively that of Benedict XVI in the address at the Collège des Bernardins, wager everything on that “quaerere Deum,” that “seeking God” which is uniquely at the origin of the monastic life in addition to being a wellspring of civilization, and today must be revived in its creative authenticity.
It is no coincidence that the latest book by Cardinal Robert Sarah - who shares this vision and is well known to be at the polar opposite of Pope Francis’s approach - bears the characteristically monastic title “Against the Dictatorship of Noise,” includes an illuminating conversation with the prior of the Grande Chartreuse, and opens with a preface by Joseph Ratzinger:
Dreher’s “option” leaves itself open to not a few criticisms, especially on account of its insistence on an “escape” from the world in order to rebuild Christian existence in small, self-contained communities, as in “an ark before the flood comes,” as Reggio Emilia bishop Massimo Camisasca objected. In discussing the book in the author’s presence in Rome, this criticism was aimed at Dreher by both the director of “L'Osservatore Romano,” Giovanni Maria Vian, and the founder of the newspaper “Il Foglio,” Giuliano Ferrara, a great secular admirer of Ratzinger.
Dreher’s response is that in any case “we ordinary Christians must work to make our faith more monastic.”
But that’s just the point. The great monasticism founded by Benedict did not separate itself from the world. On the contrary, it made a decisive contribution to building modern European civilization, founded on the concepts of the person and of freedom.
If today the “dictatorship of relativism” unmasked by Benedict XVI reigns supreme, it is inevitable that the two linchpins of the person and of freedom will also fall apart. But this is one more reason why Christians as a “creative minority” should not withdraw in private or into works of charity - as the world desires and applauds - but should continue to work in the public sphere, in the light of “quaerere Deum.” Doing precisely what Pope Benedict always preached with consistency, not only in the address at the Collège des Bernardins that marked the pinnacle of his pontificate.
Since that address of September 12, 2008 precisely ten years have gone by. If it is true that the Catholic Church as well has had “its September 11” - as Monsignor Gänswein said in commenting on Dreher’s book, referring to the catastrophe of sexual abuse - why not also mark on the calendar of history that September 12, as the start of a journey of rebirth for Christianity and civilization?
(English translation by Matthew Sherry, Ballwin, Missouri, U.S.A.)