Monday, November 3, 2014

NEW BUT STILL NOT FINISHED SAINT TERESA CHURCH IN AUGUSTA, GEORGIA

It isn't finished yet, but will be dedicated December 21st in Augusta, Georgia. Would you say this is "reform of the reform" for church architecture? Altars and windows and stations and statuary are from closed northern churches. The south as always rises again!

6 comments:

Henry Huggins said...

All right! No theater in the round! Reredos! Central Tabernacle! Verticality (more or less)! Now if the pastor REALLY had a vision for the future he would have installed a communion rail, but that can come later, probably a generation from now when the Novus-Ordo Establishment has passed.

Cameron said...

Excellentissime.

quicumquevult said...

Very nice!

Paul said...

But where does one put the folk-rock band and the "Spirit & Song" hymnals?

Seriously, it looks very nice. I hope we have moved out of the "mass in the round" and glass and aluminum architecture.

Joseph Johnson said...

With those old side altars, it looks oh, so ready for the EF Mass so it can exert an influence on celebration of the OF Mass!

Howard Jenkins said...

Joseph, Joseph…

Why don't you get your thinking cleared? We are supposed to pretend that the EF Mass never existed in the first place! We are also supposed to lie to everyone (and ourselves) and insist that the only people who want this Mass are a few nostalgic elderly people. And most importantly we cannot be honest and admit that the biggest obstacle to the EF are the elderly priests who are still nostalgic for their failed "liturgical revolution".

And we must never, never, ever agree with any kind of realistic assessment like this one from Fr. George Rutler: "The aggiornamento of Vatican II was supposed to bring in tons more people; it did just the opposite. So long as people refuse to admit there were mistakes made a generation ago — in catechesis, liturgy, addressing the real problems of secularism — they’re never going to make any real reform."

Yes Joseph, let us admire these traditional-looking new churches, but let's be careful not to admit what that tradition was, how successful it was and what a failure our "New Church" still is.

Now take another sip of Kool-Aid.