Sunday, February 2, 2014

AFTER BLIZZARDMONIUM AND SNOWSTERIA, NOT TO MENTION ICEPOCALYPSE, IT IS 75 DEGREES THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON AND SUNNY IN MACON, GEORGIA! I WONDER IF THERE WILL BE SCHOOL TOMORROW!

IT IS HOTLICIOUS AND PANDEMONIUSLYSWELTERING THIS HOTTACULAR SUNNY SUNDAY AFTERNOON! PLEASE NO SCHOOL TOMORROW! IT'S JUST TOO HOTPOCALPSE!


13 comments:

John Nolan said...

How in God's name can you have snow one day and 75 degrees (which would be classed as a heatwave in England) the next? I thought it was we who had the unpredictable climate. No wonder you're all crazy down there. And to think that George II allowed his name to be given to that strange little colony.

Anonymous said...

How in Gods name could you people in England not have yet heard about CLIMATE CHANGE....(formerly and erroneously referred to as "global warming").

Anonymous 2 said...

John,

I have been over here now for 35 years and I still can’t figure it out (like a lot of things). As best I can tell, it is something to do with the absence of the Gulf Stream producing Britain’s temperate climate and the presence of warm air from the Gulf meeting a cold Arctic front dipping deep into the South. But when it goes away things revert to their normal semi-tropical state.

You think that’s weird. Try F5 tornadoes a mile wide that stay on the ground for six or more miles and produce winds of over 250 miles per hour. We are just about to embark upon tornado season, again because warm air from the Gulf meets cooler air from the North.

John Nolan said...

We in England know all about climate change. It's rarely the same two days running and the weather has always been the main topic of conversation.

rcg said...

I had friends from UK visiting one Spring when a seasonal storm struck. A bright wall of thunderstorms towering to 60,000 feet and 300 miles long laced with lighting marched through the area dropping mile wide tornadoes as it went. We had heard the sirens and wondered where our friends had gone. Perhaps to shelter in the basement? No, they were outside in the street admiring the show of nature. Noel Coward was right.

Anonymous 2 said...

rcg: Quite right too. The British didn't win the Empire by cowering in the basement. =)

Anonymous 2 said...

John: Musn't grumble, though, right?

John Nolan said...

We grumble all the time. The rainfall for January was the highest since records began, but I guarantee that by summer we will be having drought warnings and hosepipe bans. Hey-ho.

As for the Empire, we're still giving millions in foreign aid to India, which is planning a mission to Mars. You couldn't make it up.

rcg said...

A2 you are right. I worked with SAS on occasion and they though nothing of a thirty mile 'walk', crawl up a Highland stream in freezing temps and squat in an Indonesian forest with leeches crawling on you. Yet they had white cloth and silverware on the ships.

Flavius Hesychius said...

Anonymous at 10:42, it's not related to climate change. It's always been a typical feature of a "humid subtropical" climate.

rcg said...

A2, one more semi-climate difference here is the number of bugs. That always seems to shock, or maybe disgust, family and friends.

Anonymous 2 said...

John: Of course, but after 30 minutes of shared grumbling about the weather, aren’t the grumblers likely to conclude the conversation with “Musn’t grumble. though”?

As for the Indian mission to Mars, I hope they are not using any Chinese parts in the space vehicle.

Anonymous 2 said...

Rcg: The SAS are in a league all of their own

As for the bugs in the South, well, seeing is believing. The first time I saw a Georgia wasp flying around my classroom I told the students I thought it was a B-52. And the first time I saw a Georgia roach I thought it was a mouse.