Sunday, February 3, 2019

NOW WE KNOW WHY THEY TAUGHT THAT THE MASS WAS A MEAL AND DOWNPLAYED SACRIFICE


 trattoria is an Italian-style eating establishment, less formal than a ristorante, but more formal than an osteria. There are generally no printed menus, the service is casual, wine is sold by the decanter rather than the bottle, prices are low, and the emphasis is on a steady clientele rather than on haute cuisine.

10 comments:

TJM said...

Unfortunately I had to attend the OF this evening. The priest said the black and did the red, but the 1970s music was atrocious (piano with a snare drum accompaniment), maybe 5-10% of the congregation sang. there were two altar girls in baggy albs with cinctures, bland vestments, and I noticed that maybe 1 in 20 took the wine at Holy Communion. The Eucharistic Ministers holding the chalices looked rather bored. None of this was inspiring. Quite frankly, as someone who has spent over 40 years in Church music first in a Gregorian schola, then playing the organ, serving as a cantor and soloist and choir member, this Mass would have been a far better experience if the music had been eliminated altogether.

It truly was all about fulfilling my Sunday obligation. Way to go Bugnini!!!!

TJM said...

Here's a sermon suggestion for lefty priests and bishops:

You could give a sermon lionizing what happened in New York last week. Your inspiration would be:

A standing ovation for abortion? That’s what New York’s Reproductive Health Act got in the Senate chamber when it passed last week. Lawmakers and bystanders stood and applauded a law that legalizes abortion all the way up until birth, for any reason.


Aren't those Democrats fabulous! Go for it, lefty priests and bishops. The press will LOVE you

Anonymous said...

“took the wine”?? Good grief, man!

Anonymous said...

I had the same experience as TJM. It’s universally. I don’t get the snare drum trend.

Anonymous said...

"...took the wine..." is indicative of the poster's lack of Catholicity. He's all flash/bang, but when the smoke clears, there's nothing left but hazy, addlepated nostalgia.

TJM said...

Strange,

I have NEVER heard a liberal cleric say they were distributing the Body and Blood of Christ. They always say they are distributing the Bread and Wine. My bad for taking them seriously.

Charles G said...

I'm sorry but I can't get too upset about the trattoria story. Inspiration can happen anywhere, and Fr. Bouyer happened to think of a way to use an ancient prayer to transition from the Sanctus to Eucharistic Prayer II at that locale. Who knows where any number of pious prayers may have been thought up? And while I deplore the fact that the Pseudo-Hyppolytus prayer is the only anaphora one ever hears these days, and solely because it is the shortest, I actually prefer it to EP III. EP II is actually based on an ancient anaphora, even if it was Syrian and not Roman, and even if without its proper preface, there is not much of it left. EP III was made up whole cloth by Vaggagini, no matter how logical it is and even if it does refer to sacrifice (despite the traddies' saying the OF eliminates the sacrificial nature of the Eucharist). EP IV has a nice summary of salvation history, good for once in a while, but I hate the way the new translation shifts pronouns awkwardly between "he" and "they" half way through. Choose one or the other, preferably "he", since that pronoun can properly be used to refer generically to humans of both sexes in the English language. I would prefer if the Ordinary Form used the Anglican Ordinariate rule, i.e., Roman Canon on Sundays and Solemnities, and EP II as an option on weekdays. People in the pews need to be exposed to the Roman tradition, i.e., EP I. Vaggagini was quite unjust with his criticism of the Roman Canon, which has its own logical structure and is not the embarrassing mess that Vaggagini makes it out to be.

TJM said...

Charles G,

I was under the impression, and I may be mistaken, that when the OF first came out, it was contemplated that the Roman Canon would be used on Sundays and major feasts. Unfortunately, that does not seem to be the practice in the vast majority of parishes in my neck of the woods.

Tony V said...

I agree with Charles G that inspiration can strike anywhere, and a trattoria's as good a place as any. What irks me is that for years we were lied to: told that EPII was essentially the canon attributed with such great confidence to Hippolytus, but most of us had no way of verifying that. Thanks to the internet, you can compare the two side by side, and guess what?

Similarly, we were told that funeral mass vestments now had to be white. We were never told that the GIRM also allowed violet and, more to the point, the traditional and sensible colour, black.

John Nolan said...

Charles G

Whether it was scribbled on a tablecloth in a Trastevere restaurant by Botte and Bouyer (EP II) or banged out on a 1960s typewriter by Vaggagini (EP III) it is hardly a substitute for the Roman Canon (saved at the last minute, albeit in a mutilated form, by Paul VI, and surely more than a 'pious prayer')

EP IV is a watered-down version of the anaphora of St Basil the Great. It is arguably more suitable for weekdays when there is no Creed. Incidentally, the pronouns in the English translation accurately reflect the Latin of the original, which begins in the singular (Hominem ad tuam imaginem condidisti ...) before moving to the plural (Omnibus enim misericorditer subvenisti ...)