Wednesday, June 12, 2019

HOLY SMOKES, BATMAN! SOCIAL JUSTICE RUN AMUCK OR SHOULD CATHOLICS SUPPORT SO-CALLED CIVIL RIGHTS IN SECULAR SOCIETY?????



Below is a post from The Deacon’s Bench. As I child of the 60’s who has always seen the injustices to African American citizens especially in the south, as particularly insidious, I feel strongly, because of my Catholic Faith and what I saw as a child, that we must not treat people in a prejudicial way because of race, creed or beliefs or social/psychological differences in secular society.

I guess I am a dualist and believe in separation of Church and State, but not the annihilation of the Church’s role in the public square.

There is no way within Catholicism to see any good in racism, abortion or prejudice that leads to harming people, socially, physically or otherwise.

But the question for me from the pastoral point of view is how do you call people, gay, straight or whatever to conversion to Christ where there is an ability to name sin for what it is and how destructive it is to our salvation.

What to do, what to do, Oh what are we to do????????

This news caught my eye this morning: More than six in ten (62%) Americans say they have become more supportive toward transgender rights compared to their views five years ago. By contrast, about one-quarter (25%) say their views are more opposed compared to five years ago. About three-quarters (76%) of Democrats report they have become more supportive of transgender rights in the last five years, compared to 64% of independents and only 47% of Republicans. Notably, increased support crosses ideological… Read more

11 comments:

Francis said...

God loves it when we sin because than He can reveal how merciful He is.

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

The traditional Exultet: “O happy fault, O necessary sin of Adam which gained for us so great a Savior!”

Francis said...

Sin proudly and boldly. Luther was right!

Anonymous said...

The whole LBGQT thing is baffling in the sense there can't be a huge percentage of Americans who are any of those. Accordingly, why is so much attention paid to them? If we want to call it "dualism", I think the Church has it right---not a sin to have such an orientation, but definitely a sin to act on it.

But in the meanwhile, on a different topic, I eagerly await the condemnation from bishops of Joe Biden's 180-degree turn on the Hyde Amendment, which (mostly) prohibits federal funding of abortions and has saved countless lives. Would I be unwise to hold my breath in such expectation? Biden says that Trump is an extenensial threat to America, but Biden's reversal Hyde puts countless of the unborn at risk. You would think after the 60 Million+ abortions since ROE, well, maybe, we should not do anything to increase that number?

Victor said...

Because of the unholy spirit of Vatican II, Catholic doctrine became seen as opinion in the mind of most Modern Catholics. Lovey-dovey sentimentality of the 1960/70 baby-boomer era replaced the well developed Aristotle-Thomist systematic theology that had been a strong defence against the godless world of the Enlightenment and its Modernist and post-Modernist versions of today. Today, such ideas reign as the source of doctrine for Catholics in the West, a philosophical Modernism founded on the Enlightenment that was given a lex credendi through the new Liturgy. Social justice concerns of this world have replaced concerns for the final end (goal) of man, which is the Beatific Vision.

Even there, social injustice like all injustice derives from sin. There can be no social justice until governments recognise Christ as their King, and they never will. As Leo Tolstoy once wrote, all governments are evil; the further away they are from (Christian) religion, the more evil they are.

The Church is in desperate need of a reformation to take moral leadership again, something that will not happen perhaps until Her crisis deepens and She finally heads the voice of the Holy Spirit to call real Council, a council that will clearly anathemise heretical ideas flourishing in the Church, ideas, so prevalent today even at the highest levels, ideas founded on the unholy spirit of Vatican II.

Anonymous said...

Uh, Father, you might want to re-think that cartoon you used. Batman employs an EXTREMELY vulgar word that cannot even be used on television and I am not sure you are aware of its meaning.

Anonymous said...

"In the big picture, the 1860 Census counted a total of 31,443,321 people, of which 3,953,760 were slaves. So slaves accounted for 12.6 percent of the national population."

Slaves made up only 12% of the total population, but an awful lot of attention was paid to them over the next five years - and beyond.

rcg said...

One of the fruits of Vatican II has been poor catechesis. Is it wrong to steal? Yes. Does it it deserve death? No. If we forgive stealing does that make stealing OK? No. Are all of these sexual obsessions disordered? Yes. Do they deserve persecution? No. Should they be allowed to force other people to participate in their fantasy? No. We don’t need to find ways to hurt people that are already dealing with a mental illness. Modern Catholics are not generally armed with the sword of righteousness that should fit into the sheath of tolerance.

John Nolan said...

Separation of Church and State is a secular Enlightenment concept which is not upheld in Catholic doctrine. The functions of both are distinct but complementary. The State is not only entitled, but obliged to give preference to the Catholic Church over other religions.

Of course the Enlightenment concept played out differently in America and France. America paid lip-service to a basic Deism which gave no denomination (Christian or otherwise) favoured status, although Protestantism was in practice preferred to Catholicism.

The French revolutionaries sought to bring the Church under State control. The Gallican Church had enjoyed considerable autonomy, but the laicization of the Church was too much for Louis XVI who went to the scaffold in defence of papal authority.

Anonymous said...

"The State is...obliged to give preference to the Catholic Church over other religions." Really John? Based on what? That would sure go over well here in the southern Bible Belt, where in many counties, your choices often are just Baptist or Methodist. No thanks---I have seen Iran and not interested in bringing such government here to Georgia....

Anonymous said...

B. THE CATHOLIC CHURCH AND THE POLITICAL COMMUNITY

http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/pontifical_councils/justpeace/documents/rc_pc_justpeace_doc_20060526_compendio-dott-soc_en.html#THE CATHOLIC CHURCH AND THE POLITICAL COMMUNITY