Monday, April 22, 2019

CATHOLIC AND PROTESTANT ART DEPICTING THE SAME PHOTO OP, WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE

I know Protestant art in paintings, stained glass and sculpture when I see it, compared to Catholic depictions of the same, but I can't actually articulate that difference. It is more of a visceral reaction to Protestant "art." I could tell the difference as a child as well, more a reaction than a defined rationale.

How about you?







8 comments:

Anonymous said...

The Protestant art is an illustrative realism that tries to capture what the eye can see. The Catholic art is more Romantic, it captures both what is seen and what is experienced. It allows for mystical and spiritual and emotional aspects of an event to be portrayed as much as the the the more earthy elements. Catholic art uses compositional design to guide the eye, it allows for spiritual beings with wings and halos. It doesn’t require that everything be rationalized or explained, but guides-one to experience an event.

rcg said...

Three USAFA cadets became Catholic this Holy Saturday. The Chapel is both dated and inspiring. A mix of wood, glass and stainless steel it is clearly of the 1959-60 modern style and is showing its age and is due for renovation. I asked the resident Chaplain what plans they had for the altar and rail. He assured me that they stay. The cadet choir also included some Latin chant. I spotted a Handbook for Parish Chant was carried by several of them. They all received kneeling and on the tongue. Our bishop was very competent and respectful of the Presence. During the Blessing of the Water a strong wind blew down from the mountains and rattled the windows and entered the church. Not a mere gust, it was sustained for quite some time.

John Nolan said...

I don't think that Rembrandt, whose 'Noli me tangere' you reproduce here, can be categorized as Catholic or Protestant. The depiction of the risen Christ as a gardener is in line with a tradition going back to the Middle Ages.

The other picture is kitsch, but whether Catholic kitsch or Protestant kitsch is impossible to say without the provenance.

Anonymous said...

Interesting article here on Mary Magdalene mistaking Christ as the gardener here: https://artandtheology.org/2016/04/05/she-mistook-him-for-the-gardener/

There are several depictions of the scene. Jesus in some is wearing a hat. He carries a variety of gardening tools - a shovel, a hoe, an adze.

Anonymous said...

Does anyone know of any good examples of 12th, 13th or 14th century Christian kitsch artwork?

John Nolan said...

Why do you ask, Anonymous? Do you have a penchant for kitsch? It wouldn't surprise me. The term wasn't used before 1925 and the type of religious art, often mass-produced, which can be classed as kitsch is associated with the 19th and 20th centuries.

Holman Hunt's 'The Light of the World' comes dangerously close to it.

Cletus Ordo said...

Even more recognizable is what I call "cultish art". Look no further than a copy of the Watchtower or any LDS literature and you'll see what I mean. I also noticed a similar style of painting inside the headquarters of the Rosicrucian Fellowship. Idealized, sugar-coated and weird.

TJM said...

Cletus Ordo,

I thought Obama's campaign posters came pretty close to cultish along with the Greek columns and grade school children being compelled to sing songs honoring Dear Leader.