Saturday, October 25, 2014

WELL IT WAS BOUND TO HAPPEN AND IN MY HOMETOWN NO LESS: PAGAN PRIDE PARADE!

This is in the "religion section" of Saturday morning's Augusta Chronicle. The metro area has always had witches, no kidding! And there is the occult there as I guess there is everywhere. When I was pastor of the Church of the Most Holy Trinity, we discovered at least twice the ripped apart remains of a cat that had been sacrificed on our grounds in honor, we think, of the Spring solstice. It was not a pleasant discovery and we knew it wasn't another animal that did it as there was a small fire used in the ritual!

But I digress: the article on the Pagan Pride parade in Augusta!

Augusta Pagan Pride Day, harvest ritual set for Nov. 1

By Lisa Kaylor Paganism gets a lot of negative attention around Halloween, but local groups will invite the community to see what it’s really about on Nov. 1.
Michelle Boshears (right) demonstrates a pagan ritual as Jezibell Anat looks on in preparation for the first Pagan Pride Festival in 2009. A similar ritual will be deilvered during the 2014 Pagan Pride Festival that will take place Nov. 1 at Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam.  FILE/STAFF
FILE/STAFF
Michelle Boshears (right) demonstrates a pagan ritual as Jezibell Anat looks on in preparation for the first Pagan Pride Festival in 2009. A similar ritual will be deilvered during the 2014 Pagan Pride Festival that will take place Nov. 1 at Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam.
 
A Pagan Pride Day festival will offer information about the different pagan groups in the area, plus activities, workshops and rituals. It will be held at New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam Park, which offers a pavilion in case of rain.

The event will include a performance by Bardic Fire Drum Circle, and the festival will end with a harvest ritual to honor the Earth’s bounty.

The idea behind Pagan Pride Day is to let people know that while it’s a different religion, it’s about honoring the Earth and is nothing to be concerned or frightened over, said festival spokeswoman and main ritual leader Jezibell Anat.

“It’s a different type of spirituality,” she said.

It is a diverse faith made up of many types of pagans, ranging from Wiccan to Asatru to Druidry, but they all stem from ancient roots and revere nature. Practitioners find their own path and develop their own theology, she said.

“Pagans honor the harvest and the cycle of the seasons,” Anat said. “Halloween is based on the ancient festival of Samhain, honoring those who have gone before. Honoring ancestors is a tradition that we’ve inherited.”

She said the purpose of the festival is to let the community know that pagans are here in Augusta, for those who might be searching for a group to join or for non-pagans interested in learning more about the religion.

Around town, many small circles meet in private homes, but open circles are held on Sundays at Universalist Unitarian Church. A group meets regularly for dinner and socializing. Smaller events are held throughout the year, but Pagan Pride Day is intended to be a community event.

“What we want to do is have a major public event. We want this to be a much wider outreach,” Anat said.

Admission is free, but donations of nonperishable items will be taken for the Universalist Unitarian Church of Augusta’s food shelf.

“We want to be contributing members of our community,” she said. “We just want people to know we’re here, and we want to be a part of the community and be accepted for our beliefs the way we accept other people’s beliefs.”

6 comments:

Paul said...

A common word for these pagan (and related) organizations: Pride.

Not a good beginning (or ending) step if one seeks God and has good will.

Carol H. said...

I don't think it is a coincidence that this rubbish is scheduled on All Saints Day.

Bee said...

Father, I noticed your banner announcement that Faure's Requium Mass will be sung at your All Saints Day liturgy. How I wish I was anywhere near your parish! I participated in a choir that sang that piece for a fundraising concert, and I have loved it ever since. In fact, I have put it in my will that if it is at all possible, I wish that mass to be sung for my own funeral. How I would love to hear it sung again live!
How lucky your parishioners are to have you.
God bless.
P.S. I wonder when the witches will make their political grand move as the gays have. With acceptance in the media as if their practices are equivalent to Christianity, it shouldn't be long now.

Gene said...

Well, Bee, I did see a goat wandering near the Church, but I think it may have just been Ignotus in another manifestation...

Anonymous said...

Wow..talk about ignorance and intolerance...God is love..not hate filled bigotry.

Anonymous said...

You know Bee, legally Pagan (and any other religious practices) are equivalent to Christianity. The Constitution says so. It's that whole freedom of religion thing.