Monday, June 9, 2014

THE MAJORITY OF CATHOLIC TEENAGERS AND ADULTS ARE ILLITERATE CONCERNING THE CATHOLIC FAITH--THE CURE IS BELOW


Parents, other adults, children and teenagers, the following chapters of the Baltimore Catechism will help you to be literate in the Catholic Faith and open you to God's gifts of salvation, that of Faith, Hope and Love. It doesn't get any easier and better than this!

Baltimore Catechism

14 comments:

Anonymous said...

How do our adults and teens learn about the things they DO know very well?

Daily immersion, reinforcement, role playing, reminders, carrots and sticks...and almost total social 'band wagon' support.

Thus we think it not at all odd that a boy might know every national sports team and most of the key players...but would think it weird if he knew all the major saints and councils.

We think it pretty standard that teens could recite from memory the basic dialogue of dozens of movies and top 40 songs...but weird if they could recite the rosary, creed, and more than a couple verses of scripture.

The world, flesh, and devil don't rest their project on a single hour per week with Catholic youth but insist on as many waking hours as possible.

So what are our sources of 'daily bread'? What do we reinforce in our daily media consumption? Whom do we really serve and really get excited by in our free time?

Gene said...

I love the Baltimore Catechism! It and the Athanasian Creed mince no words.

JBS said...

Pastors do well to support Catholic homeschooling families, who tend to pass on the Faith with notable effectiveness. These families may preserve the Faith in a manner not unlike monasteries during the fall of the Roman Empire.

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

Amen to that!

Anon friend said...

Yes, we ordered the Baltimore Catechism at a time when it had all but gone out of print (80's), but the Seton homeschooling curriculum still had it. Our parish priest doubted my sanity at the time... TBTG, it has begun to see a resurrection among serious Catholics for kids who are not getting proper catechesis in Faith Formation (aka CCD, aka Religious Ed, aka Catechism).

Mr. C said...

Deo gratis, FRAJM
I'm going rogue based upon LOLC.

Anonymous said...

Vey, very good post Father. Good job

qwikness said...

I gave the Saint Joseph Baltimore Catechism to a niece for first communion. I asked her mother what she thought about it. She said it was a little Dick and Janey. Which it is but that shouldn't be a turn off. I wonder if some publisher could update the illustrations.

JBS said...

I'm hoping John Nolan will share insights about the Penny Catechism, which I think was the British equivalent of our Baltimore Catechism.

Desiree said...

My husband, Dan, is walking 3 miles each way to get to Confession and Mass where he is deployed for the summer. I wonder how many other Americans would do the same.

My mother is teaching 6 year olds at her modern parish from the Original Baltimore Catechism. Their parents are learning too! My mother is Traditonal and blunt, but is keeping it age appropriate. She doesn't want anything left out bc she cares about their souls.

John Nolan said...

The so-called Penny Catechism (A Catechism of Christian Doctrine) is in question-and-answer format and covers much the same ground as the Baltimore, but is pithier and less discursive. The Baltimore gives more detailed explanations which the authors of the Penny Catechism tended to leave to those teaching it. The Penny Catechism also has more lists, particularly under the heading 'Virtues and Vices' which one had to learn. When it came to the 'four sins which cry out to heaven for vengeance' I remember as an eight-year-old asking what sodomy was. I was told it was 'the sin of Sodom' which left me none the wiser.

Published by the CTS, it has never been out of print, although it was revised slightly (some would say diluted) in 1971.

Anonymous said...

You know it's the cure. So do most of our bishops.

SO WHY ISN'T THIS BEING USED AS THE STANDARD ANY MORE?

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

Many bishops my age and older and a few younger were ingrained in the 1970's that the Baltimore Catechism was the problem with the pre-Vatican II Church and of course all things pre-Vatican II from liturgy to popular devotions to Catholics actually being obedient to the Faith were considered childish.

The Baltimore Catechism is not the be all and end all of Church religious instruction but for the vast majority of Catholic laity it is, whether we like it or not) just as the coloring book era of Religious formation was and still is.

We all know how little our teenagers know about the faith and most don't even care about the Faith and are as ambivalent towards true Catholicism as their parents are, who seldom if ever bring their children to Mass (I'm speaking of those Catholics who don't attend Mass, not the faithful who do).

I use the Baltimore Catechism when I teach in our school each Thursday and over the course of two years I can cover the entire book (simple one) with our Grades 1-6 (we don't have 7th and 8th, but I would like to remedy that in the future, but not sure how.

But back to your question...Bishops think it is outdated and the newer stuff we have is better (and it is certainly better than the stuff of the 1970s). The problem is that there are too many options and some better than others. We need a standard once again and across the country and the Baltimore Catechism is a no-brainer. Obviously there should be some updating of artwork and it should reflect both forms of the Latin Rite Mass as well as more sensitivity to ecumenical and interfaith advances. But the actual active role of the laity, while symbolized in the Mass, is not churchy, it is in the world, at home, work, play, politics, the public square.

George said...

I have to thank the Baltimore Catechism and the sisters at Holy Names, Blessed Sacrament, and Saint Anne's in Memphis for all my formal religious instruction. After that I attended public high school.