Wednesday, January 6, 2016

JUST WHO IS THAT TRYING TO IMPERSONATE MSGR. GUIDO MARINI AT THIS ORDINATION OF A BISHOP?


8 comments:

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

I don't know who the Marini impersonator is at the April 1995 Ordination of a bishop; but the Bishop is the Bishop emeritus of our Diocese, J. Kevin Boland. And His brother is to the Archbishop of Atlanta's right, Raymond Boland (RIP), and to His left is Bishop Raymond Lessard (RIP as of January 3)also bishop emeritus of our diocese.

The Guido impersonator was pastor of the Church of the Most Holy Trinity and emeritus Master of Ceremonies for the Diocese but was called back to active duty to be the MC for his first and only Episcopal Ordination.

JBS said...

I've heard your voice on a YouTube video, and you're not nearly squeaky enough to be GM!

Anonymous said...

Is that Episcopal or episcopal? I usually have seen the latter ("small e") when referring not to the Episcopal Church, but like episcopal conference of bishops...

1995 wasn't the only bishops' ordination at St. John the Baptist...a few months earlier, just before he stepped down, then Bishop Lessard allowed the cathedral to be used for the ordination of the bishop of the Savannah-based Episcopal Diocese of Georgia, Henry Louttit Jr., whose term in office roughly coincided with that of Bishop Boland. I guess Catholics though have tbe bragging rights as no Episcopal church in Savannah comes close to the eize of St. John the Baptist!

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

I can't help but see dead people and it is scary. The two priests chaplains for Bishop Boland are dead. The three bishops (Archbishop Donahue of Atlanta) are dead, Bishop Lessard having died this past Sunday at 85! He was 55 when I became his MC 30 years ago!

Then there are others who are dead. One of the seminarians carrying a candle to the right of the deacon is dead (was a priest) and the deacon himself is dead and other priests I see are dead. I see dead people! O my!

James said...

Talking about seeing dead people ... I read a very scary article a while back about overcrowding in Greek cemeteries. It's now common for bodies to be exhumed after three years and for the remains to be put in a communal ossuary. Families normally attend the exhumations, and are put through the ordeal of having to see only partly decomposed relatives dug up! It's hard to believe this happens in Europe in the 21st century:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-34920068

Anonymous said...

James, I think that is common in Italy too. Densely populated country with limited land. Or think of China with its billion plus residents. "Death" is one industry that never suffers a recession (as in funeral homes).

And Father M, Archbishop Donaghue so far has been the diocese's long-living bishop, making it to 83 before he died in 2011. Some of his predecessors died at a relatively young age---Atlanta's first archbishop for instance (Paul Hallinan) was just short of 57 when he died. Maybe there is something in the water or it is more relaxed being in less urbanized area but bishops of your diocese tend to outlive their counterparts in Atlanta, whether Bishop Lessard (85), Bishop McDnough (85 or 86) or Bishop Frey who made it to 90 something. TO put it another way, of the 6 previous bishops of Atlanta (the ones preceding Archbishop Gregory), only one (Donoghue) even lived past 75.

James said...

@anonymous 12:45
It looks like the problem is worse in Greece because the Greek orthodox church prohibits cremation. But my Googling suggests that cremation is still pretty unusual in Italy too (<10%), compared to the US (around 30%) and especially the UK (where around 70% of Catholics end up being cremated: I was surprised by how high the figure is).

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

My mother had to pay a regular fee over the years to maintain her parent's above ground tomb and prevent it from being cleaned out and used for someone else. She was very concerned about it prior to dying and asked that I take care of it, but it has been by relatives over there. I think bones would simply be placed in a common area and the tomb reused. So in effect one rents the space for the casket.

I think the same is true in New Orleans where most graves are above ground due to the water table there. bones are pushed back and more space for new arrivals. Cool, no?