Sunday, October 21, 2012

BREAKING NEWS BOMBSHELL--SURELY TO DISTURB 1970'S CATHOLIC REFORMERS, AT LEAST THOSE STILL ALIVE

POPE BENEDICT RESURRECTS PAPAL FANON AT CANONIZATION THIS MORNING IN ST. PETER SQUARE!






As well, the Old Testament Lesson, Responsorial Psalm and Epistle are proclaimed from the Epistle side of the altar and the Gospel from the Gospel side of the altar. What will happen next?

Will this be next? Stay tuned!

13 comments:

df said...

Fantastic stuff, and long may it continue.
BTW, I think you're the first person to pick this up online. Well done.

Joseph Johnson said...

I just hope this is not a one-time thing as it appears to have been with the camauro.

Marc said...

More info, including a return to an older canonization formula:

http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2012/10/the-papal-fanon-is-back.html

ytc said...

I NEARLY SPIT MY COFFEE TEN FEET WHEN I POWERED ON MY PC! This is better than gloves.

Gregorian Mass said...

It is good to see things out of the museum and put back into use. It is appropriate for the Pope and is a part of the Papal vestments and visually makes him unique as head of all the Bishops in the Church. I pray for its' continued use as well as some other items that were disregarded in haste. Maybe the Flabellum could once again stand on the balcony as a backdrop when the Holy Father speaks. No longer necessary in processions they could still be put to use in the backround. Once again the imagery would connect us to the past. That which is familiar is comfortable.

John Nolan said...

Every year the Guards regiments which are stationed in London (some will always be serving overseas) perform a ceremony in the presence of the Sovereign known as Trooping the Colour. It is more than just a spectacle for tourists. Colours are no longer carried in battle, and the precise drill movements, once vital on the battlefield, are now of course obsolete. The uniforms are late Victorian (formal British military dress stopped evolving around 1880) and yet the soldiers carry the current SA 80 rifle, to remind anyone that needed reminding that they are first and foremost fighting troops. This is ritual (the music, for instance, changes little from year to year) but it embodies a living tradition. It is worlds apart from the absurd and embarrassing opening and closing 'ceremonies' of the recent Olympic Games, which are not really ceremonies at all.

I shall leave readers to draw the fairly obvious liturgical conclusions.

Thomas Kirn said...

I believe that more priest are beginning to "try out" the Holy Father's reform; this video on Youtube was published recently which recounts the timelessness of the Faith in relation to directional prayer and Catholic Liturgy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuDAfMHzFeo&feature=plcp

I hope this catches on and stays a main feature of the parish!

Anonymous said...

Since I haven't seen any video/pictures, I don't get it. Since in the ordinary form the readings do not take place from the altar, but from an ambo (lectern) to the side of the altar, how was the epistle said on one side and the gospel on the other - did they have ambos on both sides of the altar? Who did the readings?

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

There were two ambos facing the congregation but away from the altar. Of course the deacon chanted the Gospel from the ambo which would be to the left of the altar as the laity face it and the First reading, Psalm and second reading from the opposite side. I presume laity read the readings, but did not see that.

Joseph Johnson said...

I couldn't agree more with John Nolan and, while I haven't had the privilege of seeing the "trooping of the colors" in person, I have witnessed the changing of the Guard with the impressive and very traditional uniforms and music (but with the modern rifles). While I deeply regret what happened to the Catholic Church in England during and after Henry VIII's reign, I admire very much the British penchant for incorporating and perpetuating tradition, history, and ritual in their public ceremonies. They are the world's best when it comes to these things!

In the U.S. we still have a very little bit of this (much of it inherited from the British) and I hate to see even a small part of what little we have fall victim to the mentality that we have to "change with the times." When it comes to public ceremony and ritual (whether secular or religious) we needn't make such compromises.

I still bemoan the fact that, on the Presidential inauguration day, our incoming and outgoing Presidents no longer appear in morning suits and black silk top hats. This had been the tradition for this event for quite a long time (go to Youtube and watch, for example, the inauguration of Herbert Hoover in 1929 and the last time this tradition was followed at the inauguration of John F. Kennedy in 1960 where he did, contrary to many later accounts did wear the top hat--he just didn't keep it on his head as much as the outgoing President, Dwight Eisenhower did).

Why fabricate ceremonies when you already have inherited forms, deep in meaning and history, which are very effective in reminding us of who we are and where we come from. This principle applies to liturgical practices and forms as much or more than it applies to secular ceremonies.

John Nolan said...

When celebration is versus populum, as here, the left of the altar as the laity face it is in fact the epistle side. When Mass is celebrated ad orientem at an altar where versus populum is the norm, the credence table has to be moved to the opposite side, thus ensuring that service is from the right.

John Nolan said...

@ Joseph Johnson

I'm sticking my neck out here, but I get the impression that ritual, whether military (which I have been involved with) or ecclesiastical, is very much a masculine trait. Women generally don't see the point of it, and in the pre-Conciliar Church tended to prefer individual devotions such as the Rosary.

The touchy-feely subjectivism of the post-V2 liturgy has put a lot of men off. However, at least two British chaplains in Afghanistan offer Mass in the Usus Antiquior; because it is straightforward and soldierly, the squaddies appreciate it.

Anonymous said...

Thank you John Nolan and Joseph Johnson for your words. They ring true in every sense. Tradition and ritual have a place and unfortunately in the US we have become such a throw away society. Builings are torn down with no regard for their histories. This is sad and tears at ones historical sense of self identity. When all ritual is eventually done away with people sooner or later will no longer identify with the past. A perfect example is what has happened to the pre and post conciliar Church. Ritual and Traditions must be stabilized, then appreciation will grow. But it has to start.