Friday, August 21, 2015

OH TO BE BACK IN ROMA AGAIN!

About two years ago, I was getting ready for my three month sabbatical in Rome at the Pontifical North American College. What a great place!

I'm considered an alumnus because I attended their institute. I'm flattered but know why that is. But what a great place! Oh, I said that already. I wish I could go back each year for three months! Maybe I will when I retire.

I just received an email from the North American introducing their new first year seminarians. Can you imagine the excitement of these young men to be able to study in Rome and travel Europe at their age! Please pray for them and all the new seminarians starting the academic year as well as the old timers.



7 comments:

The Greek said...

When I was working on my licentiate, I spent most of my school vacations in Italy. I don't think a more beautiful place exists.

Jusadbellum said...

Perhaps Father will correct my math, but the average age of men ordained for the Diocese of Savannah is about 28, right? And we expect our priests to serve at least 45 years, right (until 75?). So one might guestimate the maximum number of priests for the diocese by multiplying number of ordinands x 45 years. Obviously this doesn't account for transfers from other dioceses and incardinations.

Still, it means that for Savannah at least, we can expect no more than 40 or so home-grown priests unless current trends change. 50% or more will continue to be outside missionaries.

Practically though this means we are living in "the good old days" in terms of priest per parishioner coverage. It's only downhill from here until/unless there's a sudden and dramatic boom in priestly vocations.

Something to ponder on. Our boys - do they learn from other lay men that the priesthood is an honorable and heroic calling?

What practical things can lay men do to promote the idea that being a priest is a heroic, praiseworthy thing for a young man to aspire to or at a minimum, honor?

George said...


Jusadbellam:

" ...the average age of men ordained for the Diocese of Savannah is about 28, right? And we expect our priests to serve at least 45 years, right (until 75?). So one might guestimate the maximum number of priests for the diocese by multiplying number of ordinands x 45 years."

I'm wondering about your calculation. Both the number ordained and the average age will change from year to year. If there are three ordained in a certain year, then that number X 45= 75; if two, it will be just 50. Quite a difference. If you just look at a snaphot of one year I don't see that it tells you anything all that useful. Also, what has been the average number of years served by priests in the diocese? Taking the average ordained per year and the average age over the last ten years or fifteen years along with the average number of years priests have served would yield a more meaningful result.

"for Savannah at least, we can expect no more than 40 or so home-grown priests:

Over what time frame? When you say "no more than 40", time frame is important. You're saying that it could be as high as 40. Where does that number come from?

If you click on the link below, you can select "Diocese of Savannah" to see the stats from 1976 to 2013.


Future-of-priestly-ministry/priest-shortage-usa-1976-2013

The Greek said...

George,

Do you know how those numbers were obtained? I ask because the number of parishes in the Diocese of Savannah was 55, but the numbers for parishes with and without resident priests add up to 58.

George said...

The Greek

I know that some small parishes in the diocese in South Georgia were consolidated, From what I remember it was three. Perhaps someone reading the blog can enlighten us to this.

George said...

Greek:

Here is another link to Diocese of Savannah stats. You'll have to scroll down near the bottom of the page to see the stats on priests. The stats are pretty much the same as on the other link I provided. Notice that the number of parishes went from 55 in 2013 to 47 in 2014. This was due to consolidation and parish closures.


http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/diocese/dsava.html

By the way, don't infer anything from the fact that the other link I provided was to some "FutureChurch" web site, which from something I read on the site, is in favor of women deacons and the end to priestly celibacy.

Southern Catholic said...

The last man on the right in the front row is Austin Faur, from my parish, St. Joseph, in Raleigh. Please pray for all seminarians.