Wednesday, February 4, 2015

BOMBSHELL! SUNDAY MORNING CONFESSIONS PRIOR TO MASS RETURNING TO SAINT JOSEPH CHURCH FOR THE SEASON OF LENT

Because of Pope Francis' emphasis on the Sacrament of Penance and making it more readily available especially at convenient times, beginning the first Sunday of Lent and each Sunday of Lent, Confession will be heard one half hour before each Sunday morning's Mass! Only one priest will be available and confessions must conclude by the time Mass begins. Masses on Sunday morning are at 7:45 AM; 9:30 AM and 12:10 PM

Thus Confessions will be:

7:15 AM to 7:45AM      
9:00 AM to 9:30 AM     
11:40 AM to 12:10 PM

Currently Confessions are heard Monday through Friday at 7:30 AM and each Saturday at 3 PM. Two annual penance services are celebrated during the Advent and Lenten seasons. 

26 comments:

JBS said...

You're a good example for others to follow, Father McDonald.

Anonymous said...

People REALLY still do that?

Carol H. said...

Father, this is wonderful!

Anon, I'm still praying for you!

Anonymous said...

What is the point of confession anymore? Isn't Pope Francis going to formally teach that divorced Catholic living in adultrey do not need to go to confession or amend their lives, and that they are welcome to receive communion. That's what his buddy Cardinal Kasper said and the entire body of German bishops have said and Francis called this theology "done on one's knees". So if Francis says that adulterers don't need to go to confession why should I bother?

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

Hmm! Immature moral development?

TCR said...

Father, thank you. This is truly a Godsend to those of us who drive many miles to St. Joseph!

Anonymous said...

"Hip Hip Hurray!"

Joe Potillor said...

Deo Gratias!

Anonymous said...

"Hmm! Immature moral development?"

Well that comment is not surprising coming from a priest who believes in " minor mortal sins". Gee if Francis hears what you believe you'll get a red hat and an invitation to the synod.


Paul said...

Anon,

The errors of others (including Popes) are no excuse for your errors.

You should confess because you are confessing to Jesus: To cleanse the soul, to wipe away mortal sin, to receive absolution, to receive Christ.

Robert Kumpel said...

Thank you Father. I often call Confession "the forgotten sacrament" because I can actually remember as a boy going into the church on Saturday afternoon and waiting in long lines while two priests manned the Confessionals.

The devil hates Confession. He especially hates priests because of their ability to transmit God's mercy. You are a target, because you are doing the right thing. Thanks be to God.

Gene said...

Amen, Robert!

Gene said...

Another issue I have run into is just how seriously a given Priest takes Confession. At St. Jo's and a couple of other Churches I have attended, I sometimes get a lecture, a mild scolding, and a meaningful penance…from saying the Rosary, contemplating one of the Stations, or initiating a visit to a neighbor with whom I have had a heated disagreement. But, that is the exception. I recently went to Confession where, after listing my sins, I was told, "Now, your penance is to go from here and live a life of love and service." Another time, I was told to "run say an Our Father and join us in the fellowship hall for coffee and cake." Another time, I was asked what I thought my penance should be. When I said I did not know, I was told, "Well, you are too hard on yourself. Go say some Ave's and an Our Father." Somehow, for this energetic sinner, that just doesn't inspire confidence.

JBS said...

When has Pope Francis stated that adultery is not a mortal sin, or that adulterers need not go to confession?

Henry said...

What Paul said, except perhaps

The errors of others (including Popes) are no excuse for your sins.

Jacob said...

Oh Father this is absolutely wonderful news. I think you will want to extend this after lent because the fruits of your labour will be so significant. You are a model for other priests in your diocese to follow. While in Rome I saw the beautiful tradition of confessions during a traditional mass. At the bell of the hanc igitur, the priests (and penitents) exit the confessionals along the walls of the church and doff their birettas and kneel until after the last genuflection of the second elevation. A holy priest makes a holy parish.

Juden said...

Gene living a life of love and service....yeah...right.

Gene said...

Juden/Anonymous, you have no inkling of what kind of life I have lived.

Anonymous said...

I have never heard a Catholic use the term "fellowship hall"

Gene said...

RE: Fellowship Hall: Well, I believe that is exactly what he said…I never heard Catholics worship like protestants…until I joined the Catholic Church.

Gene said...

Gene makes stuff up. It should be obvious to everybody by now...

Anonymous said...

I don't get why more parishes don't do this. Kudos to you, Father.

Bee said...

I like when confessions are available on Sunday morning before Mass. Even when I am not receiving the sacrament, just seeing the little green light on over the confessional and a line of penitents waiting reminds me to reflect on my sins and at least say an act of contrition before Mass begins. It also keeps that sacrament on my mind, and I find I go more frequently when it is offered before Mass.

At the church I attend confession is available every Sunday morning all year round, but ordinarily there are so many people in line you have to arrive at least a half hour before Mass begins just to make sure you will finish before Mass starts. At our parish there are enough priests that one or two confessionals are available even during Mass until the Our Father, at which time the priests leave the confessionals to help distribute Communion.

It really is a restoration of the sacrament and very helpful. I hope your parishioners take full advantage of the opportunity to avail themselves of this sacrament during the season of Lent.

Cletus Ordo said...

OK, I'll share an experience. There was once a Saturday afternoon when I felt that I needed to go to Confession, but just couldn't get away from work. I went to a nearby parish the next day (Sunday) between Masses and asked the priest (who was relaxing in the sacristy, since there was an hour before the next Mass) if he would please hear my confession. He replied, "Oh no! We couldn't do that. It would distract us from the Eucharist. That's the focus of Sunday!" His voice was childlike and almost condescending. I said, "So, you are refusing me the sacrament of Confession?" Again, he said, "Why, we couldn't do it today! Our focus must be on the Eucharist!" I walked away in disbelief. I felt angry but I also felt like I was dealing with a priest who was clueless.

This is the same priest who once failed to give me absolution in the Confessional. I walked out, realizing what had happened (or not happened) and went back in and politely told him what he forgot to do. He insisted that he DID give me absolution then said, "The Lord forgave you before you came in here anyway." Well, if that's the case, what's the point of even going to Confession? This same priest allegedly told a young boy I knew who was attending the parish school that he never needed to go to Confession again.

I just got the feeling that this priest and many priests don't want to bother with hearing Confessions. Either it annoys them or they are lazy or it offends their pseudo-Post-Vatican II sensibilities.

That, sadly, is why more parishes don't do this.

Henry said...

"Only one priest will be available and confessions must conclude by the time Mass begins."

Why? (Assuming that a different priest is hearing confessions, who doesn't need to leave the confessional to celebrate the Mass.) Father Z has frequently commented on how sanctifying it is to confess and receive absolution during the very Mass at which you are preparing for Holy Communion.

Gene said...

Gee, Cletus, you must have made that up...just like Anonymous says I did.