Tuesday, April 29, 2014

THE SACRED PASCHAL TRIDUUM AT SAINT JOSEPH CHURCH, MACON, GEORGIA

Thanks to Dr. Buck Melton for these photos!

23 comments:

Anonymous said...

Wow....It's not hard to see who the star of this show was.

Anonymous said...

"Altar girl" alerts all over these pictures, just plain wrong. This does not promote vocations, females do not belong in the sanctuary period!!! This is what the Novus Ordo promotes how very sad, can't believe you approve of them.

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

Yes, as the Church teaches, Jesus Christ is the "Star" of the Sacraments and liturgies of the Church! In terms of altar girls and no vocations tell that to my former parish of the Church of the Most Holy Trinity in Augusta which has produced 14 priests since about 1983 all the while having altar girls too!

Wipo of Mainz said...

You can't blame the Novus Ordo for this. It was condemned as an abuse by JP II (Inaestimabile Donum 1980) and only sanctioned (with reservations) in 1994. The vocations argument is only one of a number of objections to the practice.

In bi-ritual parishes, how do you cope with the tears and stamping of little feet when the serviettes are told they can't serve the EF? Not to mention the outraged mothers who decamp with their little darlings to another parish.

Incidentally, no priest is obliged to accept a female server even if no males are available. In the OF there is little need for a server anyway.

Anonymous said...

I know what the Church teaches. What I'm talking about is what all of the people see...center stage...among all of the flowers and gold candlesticks.... in that FINE gold outfit.

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

I agree with you! The sacraments use material reality to make viable through these the invisible Christ! Yes, gold other precious fabrics, the ornate chalices that Pope Francis uses all are material things and the work of human hands to show forth Christ the crucified and risen King now robed and reigning on majesty!

Anonymous said...

Liturgy is "show business"...and there's no business like show business. I'm pretty sure you know I'm right.

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

You must have a Protestant, non liturgical sacramental theology and suspicious of Catholic sacramental theology which embraces the arts all of them including theater! Are you a coloring book catholic and missed this chapter in your cathecesis ?

Anonymous said...

Wow.

Pater Ignotus said...

Ornate chalices... show forth Christ. This is about the worst excuse for elaborate (and gaudy) vessels and vestments I have ever heard. Next we will be told that expensive, lacy altar cloths "show forth" the swaddling clothes of Jesus' nativity...

A Different Anonymous said...

Do not feed the trolls.

Anonymous said...

We trolls need neither food nor water. We subsist on BS.

Wipo of Mainz said...

Do not feed the trolls, or as we say in Latin 'nolite monstris escam dare'. Fr AJM, that chasuble is a fine example of the neo-gothic style, and I feel that the great Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin would have approved of it. It has the added advantage of being the same front and back, so is suitable for celebration in either orientation.

As a medieval German chronicler allowed access 'ad rete totius mundi' I need to ask if there is another 'monstrum' who styles himself Pater Ignotus (Unknown Father? Ignorant Father?). A comment posted at 10:17 would seem to indicate so. Nihil interest, redeo ad scriptorium.

Anonymous said...

Egad....the sixth Marx brother...Wipo. Who knew??

Cameron said...

Anon, how stupid would it look to have a gorgeous church and excellent vessels only to have a priest in a dinky party-sized polyester potato-sack at the altar celebrating Mass?

Besides, how do you know how much that chasuble cost? I'd be willing to bet it's made of lurex.

Anonymous said...

I really don't want anybody to look stupid. I do think, however, that there is much too much emphasis on this blog about vestments and languages and altar rails and on and on...gorgeous churches and excellent vessels...

I'm really not interested in discussing prices of stuff.

Wipo of Mainz said...

Dixit Sine Nomine 'I really don't want anyone to look stupid'. In that case, stop commenting.

Melius est a sapiente corripi, quam stultorum adulatione decipi; quia sicut sonitus spinarum ardentium sub olla, sic risus stulti. Sed et hoc vanitas.

[Ecclesiastes 7:vi-vii]

Anonymous said...

Since you're already aware of my stupidity, I feel free to ask whether the "i" in Wipo is pronounced like the "i" in pin or like the "y" in typo?

I love it when you respond in Latin. English is my second (actually sixth) language too.

Aerandir said...

All of this beauty is being used to bring home te glory of our risen lord and all the bitter commentators on this blah want to do is complain about how it's too beautiful for its own good. Christ is being glorified as king of the universe in these pictures, people are being brought into the body d Christ and into full communion with the church, the catholic faith is being shown as vibrant and awe inspiring and you guys have to find the negative spin for it all.

JBS said...

Fr. MacDonald,

Thank you for posting these wonderful pictures of the Sacred Triduum in your parish.

John Nolan said...

Anonymous

Wipo (sometimes spelt Wippo) has a short 'i' - the 'W' can be pronounced as in English, or as in German. The most famous bearer of this name was Wipo of Burgundy, chaplain to and biographer of the emperor Conrad II (1027-1039). He is assumed to have written the Easter Sequence 'Victimae Paschali Laudes'.

Wipo of Mainz (Wipo Mogontiacensis) was a chronicler 'discovered' at Durham University in 1969 by the late Andrew Varley and quoted frequently at length, and in Latin, in essays and exam answers. Since no-one had heard of him he was a valuable source. Doubts about his authenticity arose since he appeared to flourish in the eleventh, twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

Pater Ignotus

You are presumably aware that the topmost linen cloth on the altar symbolizes the burial shroud of Our Lord. I suggest you leave mockery of sacred objects to the heretics.

Desiree said...

Wow! People are bent out of shape over pretty linens in a pretty church all done in presentation for our Lord? Aren't we supposed to wear our Sunday best for Him? How is this any different? This church was built before any of us were born. It's the churches popping up in our lifetimes' that are sad. I drive 35 minutes to attend St. Joseph's. Before I converted I talked to my local parish's priest. He told me I'd find what I was looking for at St. Joseph's, and not at his (new, modern looking) church. (You can thank him, Father. Haha!) We definitely worship with our senses, because I feel nothing at the modern church and so much at St. Joseph's. I believe the building sets the tone for the people's worshiping.
Latin Mass at St. Joseph's is as close to Heaven as I can get without dying. If only I could get more of it!!!

Gene said...

Amen, Desiree.