Monday, February 13, 2017

DOES ANYONE KNOW? AN INQUIRING MIND WANTS TO KNOW


So the SSPX consider themselves as a religious order with vows of chastity, poverty and obedience or as a diocesan/secular priesthood with the two promises of celibacy and obedience to the bishop?

7 comments:

Julian Barkin said...

To me this is the equivalent to the question of how many angels can dance on the head of a pin. For Joe Catholic, it matters not. I care more about the possibility for them causing spiritual damage if they are let into the Church, uncontrolled and unmonitored. I'm more concerned about them attracting young people when canonized and bringing them over that fine line between Traditonalism and self-schism from Holy Mother Church due to radical Traditonalism.

Should they be reconciled, I hoped the Vatican all the way down to the diocesan level has a plan to ensure the very divisive and anti-Papacy/"modern" Church and anti-Novus Ordo attitudes is curbed down, or criticism is done to a level of those faithful orders, like the FSSP. You

Anonymous said...

Their charism is raising up holy priests for the glory of God. From the little I know about them so far the brotherhood is healthy and making progress. Like Opus Dei. Personal prelature, meaning they have their own Shepard/Bishop who is under the Pope. Independent of the territorial bishops.

Anonymous said...

No, I do not know! I could go to an SSPX chapel and do have a long desire to attend a TLM, but have never gone to one of that groups Masses because I do not understand their relationship with the Church. When that relationship is plain as day, I will attend their liturgy. Personal opinion is that they could do a lot of good if they were formed as a religious order separate from the diocese. It would give them the chance to add to a diocese instead of compete against it. It also might give them the opportunity to present their liturgy to a variety of churches throughout a region and that might inspire some parishes to pay more attention to liturgical details. Until I know exactly how they are integrated into the Roman Catholic Church, I will not attend their liturgies.

Dialogue said...

Julian Barkin,

Surely they have more in common with the Church than do the LCWR communities.

Anonymous said...

I suspect it is similar to a Society of Apostolic Life. There are no formal vows of celibacy as with religious, but only the promise that all priests and deacons make. There is no vow of poverty, they just don't get paid much. As such they can own property or items and must purchase clothing, cars, etc. themselves. Obedience would be the same as the promise priests make at ordination, but not the same as a formal vow of religious. Obedience would be to their superiors.

The Egyptian said...

JB
REALLY???

" I care more about the possibility for them causing spiritual damage if they are let into the Church, uncontrolled and unmonitored. I'm more concerned about them attracting young people when canonized and bringing them over that fine line between Traditonalism and self-schism from Holy Mother Church due to radical Traditonalism."

You mean like clown masses, priests acting like it is all about them, sloppy servers, half dressed "communion ministers", communion for all, conga line communion, folk masses, guitar masses, feminist masses, dancing girls and my favorite, Father singing show tunes for a friends sons wedding sermon.

Hell I'm praying for some kind of return to tradition, I belong to the catholic CVhurch not the Anglicans for Pete's sake

oh and they may be regularized, but I doubt they will be canonized

in other words you want them crushed, how christian of you

Henry said...

From sspx.org:

"The Society of St. Pius X is an international priestly society of common life without vows, whose purpose is to train, support, and encourage holy priests so that they may effectively spread the Catholic faith throughout the world.

"The SSPX was founded in 1970 by Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre in the diocese of Fribourg, Switzerland, adhering to all canonical norms, receiving the blessing and encouragement of the local bishop.

"The spirit of the SSPX is essentially apostolic; it was designed by its founder to operate much like a missionary order, spreading the faith far and wide. This apostolate is today especially necessary considering the spread of atheism, agnosticism, and religious indifference.

"The SSPX, to this end, seeks to draw souls closer to Christ primarily through the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, as well as through its preaching, its schools, its seminaries, and its other houses of religious formation.

"All this can be summed up in our founder’s motto: “We have believed in charity,” that is, in the love of Christ.