Friday, December 12, 2014

HAPPY "OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE"

Pope Francis celebrates the Mass of the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Patroness of Latin America, preceded by the recitation of the Rosary, and an Advent prayer at the Patriarchal Basilica of Saint Peter's in Vatican City, 12 noon est, December 12:

14 comments:

JBS said...

I think it would have to be a votive Mass, since she does not appear to be on the Roman calendar.

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

In the new Roman Missal which I used today for Our Lady of Guadeloupe, it is in it and designated as a Feast with the Gloria (which I didn't use, because I failed to look at the Missal or Ordo that designates it as a feast.

JBS said...

I think that's a USA insertion.

Steven Surrency said...

It is a feast in the US but just a memorial on the Universal Calendar, methinks.

Henry said...

Whereas it's a (required) feast in the U.S., I understand it's just an optional memorial on the universal Church calendar. So outside the Americas (in England, for instance) today is just a ferial day--neither a solemnity, feast, or (mandatory) memorial--on which there are options including celebration of a memorial of Our Lady of Guadalupe. For instance, December 12 is also an optional memorial of St. Jane Frances de Chantal.

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

Well this particular setting of the Mass is a Requiem for the Reform of the Reform " of the Mass . The musical setting is performed by performers in an entertainment format. The Gloria could have been a segment on Ed Sullivan if I can date myself! It is non denominational mega church stuff!

Henry said...

"Well this particular setting of the Mass is a Requiem for the Reform of the Reform of the Mass"

I don't understand. What does this Mass setting have to do with the reform of the reform? Doesn't the Misa Criolla setting date from the raucus 1960s?

Henry said...

". . . because I failed to look at the Missal or Ordo that designates it as a feast."

Whereas when I, a simple layman, awake in the morning, before my feet hit the floor, I'm consciously thinking either solemnity (class 1) or feast (class 2) or memorial (class 3) or feria (class 4). Simply because every night after compline I look ahead (usually eagerly) to the Liturgy of the Hours for the following day. Keeps me grounded in the Church calendar day in and day out.

John Nolan said...

The Misa Criolla is a 'concert Mass' but this does not preclude its use in the liturgy. The same could be said of the Haydn Masses, although I'm reliably informed that these would have been performed while a Low Mass was in progress, and so would not have had to compete with Gregorian chant.

I actually quite like the Misa Criolla but on this occasion it was marred by the female soloist, whose pop style of singing (shouting) and ridiculous exhibitionism contrasted with the choir, who sang with obvious enjoyment and commitment but who were disciplined and musical. Some of the instrumentalists needed to cut down on the histrionics - rattling a stick with bells on it isn't the same as performing the solo part in the Brahms fiddle concerto.

By the way, if the altar candles are pushed any further to the side, they are likely to fall off the edge.

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

Yes, the soloist was performing as though she was in a theater because she is a performer and didn't seem to understand that music serves the liturgy not the other way around, but this is typical of many contemporary ensembles that sing at Mass today, especially if they are positioned where everyone can see them. Even the directors of the televising of this Mass focused the camera on her for most of the time she was singing and swaying.

If not for the soloist, the music would have been fine or a more subdued solist.

George said...

The soloist had the style characteristic of many of the Latin(Latino) professional singers. Very expressive and emotive,as is a lot of the music they perform. Not suitable for Mass however. (Although in Mexico, Central and South America it may not be a problem)

Fr Jim said...

Actually she only looks like a performer because the camera did a close up on her. In the large expanse of the basilica she would have been practically unseen, especially as she was positioned immediately in front of the conductor. She sings with expression as they say, and you need to sing that way to project your voice.

George said...

Fr Jim
St Peter is quite large (from what I've been told-I've never been there)so you make a good point. I was thinking of this in a much smaller ecclesial venue where it would be too overpowering.
Also this was a special occasion honoring Our Lady of Guadalupe.

John Nolan said...

Fr Jim

'You need to sing that way to project your voice'. No you don't (ask any opera singer) and in any case she was 'singing' into a hand-held microphone which served to emphasize the 'pop idol' image.

When Herbert von Karajan conducted Mozart's Coronation Mass with the Wiener Philharmoniker and Singverein in St Peter's on 29 June 1985 none of the soloists required amplification. Check out Kathleen Battle's exquisite singing of the Agnus Dei. JP II (then only 65) had a good strong voice and the deacon who sang the Gospel was later one of the Irish singing group 'The Priests'.