Saturday, November 3, 2018

SAINT ANNE’S ALL SOULS REQUIEM MASS PHOTOS

LET MY SACRIFICE RISE BEFORE YOU O GOD AS A PLEASING FRAGRANCE!

 O LORD, I AM NOT WORTHY THAT YOU SHOULD COME UNDER MY ROOF, SPEAK BUT THE WORD AND MY SOUL SHALL BE HEALED! 
 O LORD, I AM NOT WORTHY THAT YOU SHOULD COME UNDER MY ROOF, SPEAK BUT THE WORD AND MY SOUL SHALL BE HEALED!  

 O LORD, I AM NOT WORTHY THAT YOU SHOULD COME UNDER MY ROOF, SPEAK BUT THE WORD AND MY SOUL SHALL BE HEALED!



After our All Souls Requiem, a parishioner who has never attended an EF Mass or any Mass celebrated ad orientem, spoke to me after the Mass and declared:

For the first time, I realized the Mass is an OFFERING to God. When I heard the Mass was a sacrifice, I thought it meant that it was a sacrifice we must do to make time for God. This Mass made it clear to me that the Mass is the SACRIFICE!


See more exquisite photos by Pressing here for Saint Anne All Souls Requiem photos!

12 comments:

TJM said...

Congratulations, Father McDonald, for celebrating this Mass at St. Anne's. Hopefully, it is just the start of a good thing.

Your parishioner's heartfelt comment ought to be taken seriously by those members of the clergy who are so dismissive of the EF.

Anonymous said...

Beautiful pictures! We had so wanted to make the long drive down for this, but just too many time constraints.

Mallen

Anonymous said...

Jack here...

“Let my prayer rise like incense before you; and the lifting up of my hands be an evening sacrifice. Hasten to me, O Lord.”

—from our Eastern Rite Vespers

Anonymous said...

Jack here...

Beautiful pics of a beautiful Liturgy. I’d give almost anything to be there—we have no access in this Deanery thanks to a Bishop and priest opposed to the EF locally. Your parishioners have no idea how fortunate they are.

Henry said...

"For the first time, I realized the Mass is an OFFERING to God. . . ."

Not an uncommon story. A person attends Mass in his native language for decades, and never learns what's happening. Attends a single traditional Mass in Latin, and gets it.

Is there a clear message here? Surely, except for those who "have eyes but do not see, and ears but do not hear".

Carol H. said...

I attended the EF Requiem Mass at St. Joseph with my husband last evening. It was beautiful! I thank you, Fr. McDonald for starting this tradition at St. Joseph, and I thank Fr. Winchell for continuing it!



I also want to thank everyone who prayed for my health. The yellow in my skin is almost completely gone, and I haven't received a bad report from my blood test so all must be good. Thanks be to God, and again, thanks for your prayers!

rcg said...

Father, you should remind you parishioners from Ft Stewart that those words are from a Centurion. They move me powerfully every Mass.

Anonymous said...

Jack here...

Surely have been praying and hoping, Carol. So was it due to antibiotic?
Glad for update.

TJM said...

Carol, so good to hear!!! Deo Gratias

Kudos, Father McDonald, the seeds you planted are bearing fruit! You and I are the similar in age ( I am a bit older). I remember when our Church was a great universal Church before it was balkanized by left-wing loons. I never caved to the fake liturgical renewal because I was properly trained in the Latin and Chant and I thank God every day that I lived to see the day when the EF (and the OF in Latin) are now available. I rarely, if every, attend the boring, banal OF in English with its awful music.

rcg said...

Carol, Glad you are doing well. Sounds like both you and St Anne's Parish are both happy stories in these troubled times.

Anonymous said...

Tell me the type of chasuble you wore for the EF Mass...I can't think of the type offhand---Gothic? Fiddlesticks? I think the type you wore is easier to maneuver (hand movements) than the modern-day ones, and lets us see more of the alb (which you can hardly see at all with some modern-day chasubles).

Fr. Michael J. Kavanaugh said...

The style is mistakenly called "fiddleback" since it is the front that is shaped somewhat like a fiddle.

Until the 15th and 16th centuries chasubles had been more "ample" (full cut), much more, in many cases.

When the pared down style was coming into vogue, none other that St Charles Borromeo said that the minimalism represented a break with tradition and stated that chasubles should be at least 51 inches wide (wrist to wrist) and reach almost to the heels of the wearer. The set of chasubles I own and wear are very full cut, reaching almost from wrist to wrist and down to my ankles.

I have worn this style since I was ordained 33 years ago and have no difficulty with the movements and gestures.