Tuesday, October 17, 2017

ACTRESS IS CRITICIZED FOR SUGGESTING THAT IF WOMEN DON'T WANT TO BE VICTIMS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT THEY SHOULD DRESS MODESTLY




DAMIAN DOVARGANES AP
In a Facebook Live interview with The New York Times on Monday, actress and author Mayim Bialik discussed a recent opinion piece that drew accusations that she was blaming accusers of Harvey Weinstein.

In one of the news stories about Harvey Weinstein, an actress stated he made unwanted sexual advances toward her. Then she had the audacity to state that when a movie casting agent asks an actress to wear a bikini to a private audition so he can see her body since flesh will be the star of the movie, she should feel safe doing so.

No one wants to be a victim and yes, Harvey Weinstein should be charged if he victimized women who enticed him.

But just as one wears a seat belt to help reduce injury  when someone runs a red light, one should dress modestly to prevent from becoming a victim of sexual assault.

Miriam Bialik  became politically incorrect by suggesting women dress modestly to prevent from becoming a victim of sexual assault and was forced to walk it back. She understands concupiscence but was bullied into "clarifying" her remarks by a culture than is blind to it thus putting victims at higher risk:

BIALIK TALKS BACKLASH OVER WEINSTEIN COMMENTS

Actress Mayim Bialik has clarified her comments on the sexual assault and sexual harassment allegations against film producer Harvey Weinstein after an opinion piece she wrote drew accusations of victim blaming.

Bialik wrote in a New York Times piece published Friday that she makes choices to be “self-protecting and wise” like dressing modestly and not acting flirtatiously.

She later added that nothing “excuses men for assaulting or abusing women” and women should be able to wear and act however they want.

Bialik responded to social media criticism in a Facebook interview with the Times on Monday.

She says women can’t avoid being “the victim of assault by what you wear or the way you behave.” She adds that she regrets that the piece “became what it became.”
— ASSOCIATED PRESS

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