Thursday, July 3, 2014

I WONDER WHO SPOKE THESE WORDS? CAN YOU GUESS?



 “The lamb’s wool is meant to represent the lost, sick or weak sheep which the shepherd places on his shoulders and carries to the waters of life…the parable of the lost sheep, which the shepherd seeks in the desert, is an image of the mystery of Christ and the Church. The human race—every one of us—is the sheep lost in the desert which no longer knows the way. The son of God will not let this happen; he cannot abandon humanity in so wretched a condition. He leaps to his feet and abandons the glory of heaven in order to go in search of the sheep and pursue it all the way to the Cross. He takes it upon his shoulders and carries our humanity; he carries us all—he is the good shepherd who lays down his life for the sheep. What the Pallium indicates first and foremost is that we are all carried by Christ. But at the same time it invites us to carry one another in Christ.”

15 comments:

JBS said...

Would you say that someone who has just received a pallium is "appalled"?

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

No, he should not be appalled but should change his name to Lium.
But who said the quote?

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

He could be a pal Lium type archbishop

Ceile De said...

HH BXVI PBUH?

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

You win the prize!

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

But what does PBUH mean?

rcg said...

Something to do with Gilbert and Sullivan?

Anonymous 2 said...

Father McDonald:

Regarding the meaning of PBUH, I suspect the person posting the comment was borrowing an Islamic convention. PBUH is a contraction used in Islamic writing when referring to the Prophet Muhammad. It is put after the Prophet’s name and means “Peace Be Upon Him,” although there seems to be some question whether a contraction is appropriate. The phrase is also said orally when mentioning the Prophet. Some Muslims apparently use it in connection with other recognized prophets as well, although here again there seems to be some question how correct this latter practice is.

In any event, it is an expression of great respect and honor.

Anonymous 2 said...

P.S. Peace Be Upon Him or PBUH is, of course, an English translation from the Arabic.

Joe Potillor said...

Pope Benedict XVI said this, our dear Emeritus spoke often of making sure that we don't get the orthodoxy and orthopraxis disjointed from each other, that is we're called to serve the poor just as much as we're called to give to God proper worship that is due unto him. The difference is Pope Benedict XVI never forced it down our throats, and there was never an ostentatiousness about his love of the poor, he did so without the cameras and without the attention and always tried to make Christ the central point and not his own person. For whatever good intentions that Pope Francis is trying to do in stressing the marginalized, it's coming off at least to me as forced and ostentatious, and that is something that drives me absolutely nuts.

Gene said...

So, for Muslims we mean "Put Bacon Under Ham…" Yeah, that's it. LOL!

George said...


Just to clear up any who might think otherwise, it is not where the term "Grand Poobah" originated.

John Nolan said...

What isn't usually mentioned is that after finding the lost lamb, the shepherd would break one of its legs. By the time it had healed, the lamb would have learnt to stay with the flock.

John Nolan said...

BTW, I love that photo of Pope Francis being given his Sunday lunch to take away. No wonder he looks pleased.

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

In the USA those who speak good English say take-out! :)