Thursday, January 2, 2014

FOR THOSE WHO DISLIKE ROMAN CUT VESTMENTS, CERTAINLY THEY'LL LOVE THE ALTERNATIVE

To be honest with you, this look is a bit over the top and a bit too frilly for my liturgical tastes:
So some might presume that I would love the modern look with the Benedictine Altar arrangement:
NOT! NOT! NOT! NOT! MARY UN-DOER OF KNOTS PRAY FOR US!


7 comments:

rcg said...

That guy looks like a cookie.

Anonymous said...

Fr. Z did this post first. Originality Father, originality.

Anonymous said...

Jesus and I think there's no such thing as too much gold.

Joseph Johnson said...

Hey, he's got a chalice veil with that byootiful rose vestment!!

Joseph Johnson said...

I see nothing wrong with what Pope Benedict XVI is wearing. The chasuble, mitre and chair all look well together. Maybe (maybe) the alb is a bit on the frilly side but it is not unusual to see something like that (always worn over a cassock) with traditional Roman style vestments.

I get really (really) tired of seeing the plainer (usually textured polyester) style of full Gothic vestments. The happy medium is the semi-Gothic style (usually made of some kind of damask or brocade and trimmed on the edge with a narrow gold galloon tape with the Y-orphrey). This style seems to be making a comeback--especially with some of the younger priests.

Joe Potillor said...

Love Pope Benedict XVI's vestments. As for the second pair, giving a byzantine cross, and a few minor clean ups the vestments wouldn't be that horrible. (The cross shape seems more appropriate for a Byzantine Cross)

Pater Ignotus said...

The entire chapel, vestments included, were designed by Henri Matisse.

From an artist's website: "In total contrast I visited the Chapelle du Rosaire in Vence a couple of years ago. This building was based on a concept by Matisse. The building work started in 1949 and was completed in 1951.
The poignant story behind the Chapel’s inception is that in 1941 when Matisse was living in Nice, he was diagnosed with cancer. He placed an ad asking for “a young, pretty nurse” to help in his recovery. Monique Bourgeois was the successful applicant and took great care of the artist. In 1943 Monique decided to join the Dominican convent in Vence ultimately becoming Sister Jacques-Marie. When Matisse moved to the same small town the young nun asked him if he would help in the design of a new chapel. So began a four year project that involved designs for the architecture, stained glass windows, interior design, murals and vestments."

I don't care for this black and rose design, but some of the others in the collection are very beautiful.