Thursday, June 27, 2013

VATICAN RADIO HIGHLIGHTS THE SACRA LITURGIA CONFERENCE ONCE AGAIN WHICH IS GOING ON IN ROME THIS WEEK AND PROMOTES TRUE LITURGICAL RENEWAL IN CONTINUITY WITH THE EXTRAORDINARY FORM


Listen to the most excellent interview Jeffrey Tucker and Christopher Wells speaking with Vatican Radio on chant in the liturgy as Vatican Radio yet again gives a plug to the Roman conference on the Liturgy, Sacra Liturgia. LISTEN HERE!

(Vatican Radio) The 2013 Sacra Liturgia Conference is continuing this week in Rome.

The four-day Conference, organized by Bishop Dominique Rey of Fréjus-Toulon, France, focuses on the study, promotion and renewal of the appreciation of liturgical formation and celebration, and its foundation for the mission of the Church. It’s one of many initiatives taking place during the Year of Faith, commemorating 50 years since the opening of the Second Vatican Council.

The Conference brings together a wide range of renowned speakers, including Cardinals Malcolm Ranjith and Raymond Burke, along with many other international experts on the liturgy.

Jeffrey Tucker is the new editor of the New Liturgical Movement blog. He spoke with Christopher Wells about the role of the internet in the liturgical renewal, and about the promotion of good liturgy, and in particular sacred music.

“The internet is a magical thing in some ways,” he said, “because anything that appears on it becomes malleable, it becomes universal.”

Tucker spoke about how the new means of social communication can open up the riches of sacred music. “So if you can put out there a chant, and invite people to download it, or a YouTube of a chant . . . you have the perfect teaching tool, the perfect tool for distribution.” He said the internet allows sacred music to become truly universal: “So you can really achieve that notion of universality that has always been spoken about, with regard to sacred music.”

The new efforts to emphasize the importance of the liturgy and sacred music is rooted in the past, but Tucker says it is really focused on the future: “I think our movement is not really about the past. It’s about a beautiful future, more than anything else. And I see this future unfolding every day in my work. . . . The point is that we are seeing progress in our times right now. And ready to leave the past behind, and move on to a brilliant future so that we can achieve that original goal of the 19th century liturgical movement, and the goals of the second Vatican Council.”




1 comment:

Joseph Johnson said...

"It's about a beautiful future". . .NOT the 1974 Sacramentary (and the ethos of that era, which includes long flared sideburns, turtlenecks, gold neck chains, doubleknit polyester leisure suits, Roe v. Wade (1973) and Richard Nixon ending the convertibility of dollars to gold in August 1971, which started the "new" economy and "fiat" currency (based on treasury debt) and set off a lot of the global economic problems that we are still dealing with today).