Saturday, September 15, 2012

YOURS TRULY IS IN THIS VIDEO, MINUTE 2:32, DON'T BLINK OR YOU'LL MISS IT, TOOK ME 20 TRIES TO STOP IT TO MAKE SURE IT WAS ME AND MY GLORIOUS CHURCH, IN THE EF, AND OF COURSE IT WAS!


And of course this was an interview I did 35 years ago when I entered the seminary :)
(I pray he makes it!)

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Father, I have watched that video probably a dozen times and never noticed that was our Church! Amazing eyes you have! That's really cool and I love this video even more now!

Marc

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

It went by so fast the first time I watched it as though it was subliminal and then I tried to find it and stop it and couldn't for the longest time. Funny!

Joseph Johnson said...

Father,
Yesterday, during lunch, I happened to turn to EWTN and saw most of a show called "On Location: The Liturgical Reform of Benedict XVI," (I hope I am remembering the title correctly)which was a talk by a younger FSSP priest named Fr. Brian Austin (who was formerly assigned to Florida but is now in Alabama, I believe).

Incidentally, Fr. Austin mentioned that he was ordained by Bishop Bruskewitz (of whom he spoke very highly). This was a very good talk which was a summation of the reforms since Vatican II but which especially focused on the pontificate of Benedict XVI and most especially on the effect of Summorum Pontificum over the past five years. I plan to order a video of this one, if it is available.

Henry Edwards said...

Courtesy of The Chant Cafe today:

BAD CHURCH MUSIC IS A SIN
Atlanta Journal Constitution

http://www.ajc.com/news/lifestyles/religion/bad-church-music-is-a-sin/nR9jf/

John Nolan said...

I have been following this blog with great interest, and the idea of 'the Ordinary Form celebrated extraordinarily' is something I have been used to for the past 40 years. This morning I attended Solemn OF Mass at the London Oratory (all three English Oratories are within driving/commuting distance but Brompton has a special resonance for me as it restored my spirits in the dark days of the 1970s).

Now the LO isn't your average parish - it has a professional choir and enough clergy to do the liturgy properly - but they were determined to maintain their reputation for musical and liturgical excellence. The late Fr Napier adapted the Oratory tradition to the Novus Ordo which has led to a somewhat idiosyncratic Solemn Mass. The Asperges accompanies the entrance procession and the former prayers follow it; since they include Dominus vobiscum they act as the NO greeting and the Asperges is a sacramental which serves as a penitential rite; the Kyrie follows.

The Mass is sung in Latin with the Roman Canon as the default position; twenty years ago it was sung, but now it is recited in a low but audible (thanks to the microphones) voice. Ad orientem and kneeling for Communion were never abandoned and EMHC or 'serviettes' would be anathema (not that they are needed).

The Holy Week services (again according to the NO which is arguably better than the botched 1955 version) are truly wonderful; I have not seen them done better, and I have travelled a lot. Reform of the Reform is not recent. I know that many contributors on this blog think that the OF is so deficient it must be replaced; I love the Usus Antiquior on which I was brought up and attend it regularly, and the Oratory celebrate it every day (along with the OF in both English and Latin) but the current use of the Church is valid and indeed normative. It all depends on how it's done.

ytc said...

ytc here, back after a hiatus.

John Nolan, I've said this time and time again. What can be done is not going to change the status quo. Few care about going beyond the minimum. Most care only about what must be done. And now, what the bar of what must be done has been set so low--intentionally or unintentionally is not important--that the consistent product is of very poor quality.

I am to the point now where I don't really care what this or that group or person in the 1960s wanted or intended. I now know and will brazenly state that it has mostly failed, bottom line, regardless of intentions. The overall rotting of church culture has affected everything, not just liturgy. Now, if someone has a fund for me to donate to...

John Nolan said...

ytc

Of course, of course. With a little forward planning (the internet helps) you can avoid the horrors and even forget that they exist. But I can (just) remember the time when you could walk into any Catholic church and know exactly what to expect. That this is no longer true is the lasting legacy of the Council and the pontificate of Paul VI, and it has caused more damage than the protestant 'Reformation' ever did.