Saturday, May 13, 2017

POPE MAKES TWO MORE SAINTS; ALL IN A DAY'S WORK AND THE HOLY FATHER'S REALLY, TRULY, KOOL MONSTRANCE!

Canonization Mass--weather was suppose to be rainy but Our Lady of Fatima made the sun appear and well, you know the rest of the story!




Pope Fatima: Homily for Canonization Mass

13/05/2017 11:53
Pope Francis during the Canonization Mass in Fatima - AFP
Pope Francis during the Canonization Mass in Fatima - AFP




(Vatican Radio) The highlight of Pope Francis’ apostolic visit to Fatima is the canonization Mass this Saturday morning, during which the two shepherd children, Blessed Francisco and Blessed Jacinta are being declared saints in heaven.

During his homily the Pope said, "we can take as our examples Saint Francisco and Saint Jacinta, whom the Virgin Mary introduced into the immense ocean of God’s light and taught to adore him."

Below find the English translation of the Pope's Homily

Homily of His Holiness Pope Francis

Holy Mass, Basilica of Our Lady of the Rosary of Fatima

13 May 2017



“[There] appeared in heaven a woman clothed with the sun”. So the seer of Patmos tells us in the Book of Revelation (12:1), adding that she was about to give birth to a son. Then, in the Gospel, we hear Jesus say to his disciple, “Here is your mother” (Jn 19:27). We have a Mother! “So beautiful a Lady”, as the seers of Fatima said to one another as they returned home on that blessed day of 13 March a hundred years ago. That evening, Jacinta could not restrain herself and told the secret to her mother: “Today I saw Our Lady”. They had seen the Mother of Heaven. Many others sought to share that vision, but… they did not see her. The Virgin Mother did not come here so that we could see her. We will have all eternity for that, provided, of course, that we go to heaven.

Our Lady foretold, and warned us about, a way of life that is godless and indeed profanes God in his creatures. Such a life – frequently proposed and imposed – risks leading to hell. Mary came to remind us that God’s light dwells within us and protects us, for, as we heard in the first reading, “the child [of the woman] was snatched away and taken to God” (Rev 12:5). In Lucia’s account, the three chosen children found themselves surrounded by God’s light as it radiated from Our Lady. She enveloped them in the mantle of Light that God had given her. According to the belief and experience of many pilgrims, if not of all, Fatima is more than anything this mantle of Light that protects us, here as in almost no other place on earth. We need but take refuge under the protection of the Virgin Mary and to ask her, as the Salve Regina teaches: “show unto us… Jesus”.

Dear pilgrims, we have a Mother. Clinging to her like children, we live in the hope that rests on Jesus. As we heard in the second reading, “those who receive the abundance of the grace and the free gift of righteousness exercise dominion in life through the one man, Jesus Christ” (Rom 5:17). When Jesus ascended to heaven, he brought to the Heavenly Father our humanity, which he assumed in the womb of the Virgin Mary and will never forsake. Like an anchor, let us fix our hope on that humanity, seated in heaven at the right hand of the Father (cf. Eph 2:6). May this hope guide our lives! It is a hope that sustains us always, to our dying breath.

Confirmed in this hope, we have gathered here to give thanks for the countless graces bestowed over these past hundred years. All of them passed beneath the mantle of light that Our Lady has spread over the four corners of the earth, beginning with this land of Portugal, so rich in hope. We can take as our examples Saint Francisco and Saint Jacinta, whom the Virgin Mary introduced into the immense ocean of God’s light and taught to adore him. That was the source of their strength in overcoming opposition and suffering. God’s presence became constant in their lives, as is evident from their insistent prayers for sinners and their desire to remain ever near “the hidden Jesus” in the tabernacle.

In her Memoirs (III, 6), Sister Lucia quotes Jacinta who had just been granted a vision: “Do you not see all those streets, all those paths and fields full of people crying out for food, yet have nothing to eat? And the Holy Father in a church, praying before the Immaculate Heart of Mary? And all those people praying with him?” Thank you, brothers and sisters, for being here with me! I could not fail to come here to venerate the Virgin Mary and to entrust to her all her sons and daughters. Under her mantle they are not lost; from her embrace will come the hope and the peace that they require, and that I implore for all my brothers and sisters in baptism and in our human family, especially the sick and the disabled, prisoners and the unemployed, the poor and the abandoned. Dear brothers and sisters, let us pray to God with the hope that others will hear us; and let us speak to others with the certainty that God will help us.

Indeed, God created us to be a source of hope for others, a true and attainable hope, in accordance with each person’s state of life. In “asking” and “demanding” of each of us the fulfillment of the duties of our proper state (Letters of Sister Lucia, 28 February 1943), God effects a general mobilization against the indifference that chills the heart and worsens our myopia. We do not want to be a stillborn hope! Life can survive only because of the generosity of other lives. “Unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains just a single grain; but if it dies, it bears much fruit” (Jn 12:24). The Lord, who always goes before us, said this and did this. Whenever we experience the cross, he has already experienced it before us. We do not mount the cross to find Jesus. Instead it was he who, in his self-abasement, descended even to the cross, in order to find us, to dispel the darkness of evil within us, and to bring us back to the light.

With Mary’s protection, may we be for our world sentinels of the dawn, contemplating the true face of Jesus the Saviour, resplendent at Easter. Thus may we rediscover the young and beautiful face of the Church, which shines forth when she is missionary, welcoming, free, faithful, poor in means and rich in love.

Pope Francis blesses the sick following Mass in Fatima

Pope Francis blesses the sick with Most Holy Sacrament, at the conclusion of the Solemn Mass in Fatima - REUTERS
Pope Francis blesses the sick with Most Holy Sacrament, at the conclusion of the Solemn Mass in Fatima - REUTERS
13/05/2017 12:28
(Vatican Radio) At the conclusion of the Mass in Fatima, after a period of Adoration of the Most Holy Sacrament, Pope Francis gave a special blessing to the sick, who had come to the Shrine to pray to Our Lady.

Following the blessing, the Holy Father greeted the sick, reminding them that “whenever we experience a cross,” Jesus “has already been there ahead of us.” He continued, “In His passion, He took upon Himself all our suffering.  Jesus knows the meaning of sorrow and pain.  He understands us, He comforts us and He gives us strength, as He did to Saint Francisco Marto and Saint Jacinta, and to the saints of every time and place.”

Pope Francis called on those suffering from illnesses to live their lives as a gift: “Like the shepherd children, tell Our Lady that you want to offer yourselves to God with all your heart.”
Below, please find the full text of Pope Francis’ remarks:

Greeting of His Holiness Pope Francis to the Sick
Basilica of Our Lady of the Rosary of Fatima
 13 May 2017
Dear brothers and sisters who are sick,

As I said in the homily, the Lord always goes before us.  Whenever we experience a cross, he has already been there ahead of us.  In his passion, he took upon himself all our suffering.  Jesus knows the meaning of sorrow and pain.  He understands us, he comforts us and he gives us strength, as he did to Saint Francisco Marto and Saint Jacinta, and to the saints of every time and place.  I think of the Apostle Peter, in chains in the prison of Jerusalem, as the whole Church prayed for him.  The Lord comforted Peter.  That is the Church’s ministry: the Church asks the Lord to comfort the afflicted like yourselves, and he comforts you, even in ways you cannot see.  He comforts you in the depths of your hearts and he comforts you with the gift of strength.

Dear pilgrims, we have before us Jesus hidden yet present in the Eucharist, just as we have Jesus hidden yet present in the wounds of our brothers and sisters who are sick and suffering.  On the altar, we worship the flesh of Jesus; in these our brothers and sisters, we encounter the wounds of Jesus.

 The Christian adores Jesus, the Christian seeks Jesus, the Christian can recognize the wounds of Jesus.  Today the Virgin Mary asks all of us the same question that, a hundred years ago, she asked the shepherd children: “Do you want to offer yourselves to God?”  Their answer - “Yes, we do!” – makes us able to understand and imitate their lives.  They lived life, with its share of joy and suffering, as an offering to the Lord.

I invite those of you who are sick to live your lives as a gift.  Like the shepherd children, tell Our Lady that you want to offer yourselves to God with all your heart.  Don’t think of yourselves simply as the recipients of charitable solidarity, but feel that you share fully in the Church’s life and mission. 

Your silent presence, which is more eloquent than a flood of words, your prayers, the daily offering of your sufferings in union with those of Jesus crucified for the salvation of the world, the patient and even joyful acceptance of your condition – all these are a spiritual resource, an asset to every Christian community.  Do not be ashamed of being a precious treasure of the Church.

Jesus will pass close to you in the Blessed Sacrament as a sign of his closeness and love for you.  Entrust to him your sorrows, your sufferings, all your weariness.  Count on the prayer of the Church, which from every corner of the world rises up to heaven for you and with you.  God is our Father, and he will never forget you.

7 comments:

George said...

“[There] appeared in heaven a woman clothed with the sun”.

The Sun exists in a place which by our earthly measurement is a great distant from our planet. Yet it sustains us by it's light and heat which comes to us and without which we would not exist. The Sun, though far from us, is present to us in what it provides so that we can continue in existence. The Lord God, who is present in the Eternal Heaven, also makes present His sustaining power continually in all times and places by which He keeps all Creation in existence. Just as the sun sends down it's light, God likewise sends down to us His Holy grace. He even at times has sent down His Holy Mother to us, clothed in the Divine Light of the Eternal Heaven . Being greater that our Sun though, God, in the Person of His Son, makes Himself physically present on our altars in the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist. In the Host shaped like the sun, is our God whom we adore, transmitting to us the Divine sunlight of His Holy Grace for our spiritual benefit.
So while the Sun sends down it's light and heat to sustain us in our physical existence, God Himself, in the Person of His Son, comes down to us in Holy Communion to sustain us spiritually. How incomprehensibly great is our God in all He does for us.

Mark Thomas said...

It is raining in Fatima as His Holiness Pope Francis is on his way to Rome.

Heavy rain in Fatima was predicted Friday and Saturday. But as Father McDonald noted, "...Our Lady of Fatima made the sun appear and well, you know the rest of the story!"

Pax.

Mark Thomas

Fr Martin Fox said...

A small demurral amidst so much to praise, but: I do not share your enthusiasm (if it be such) for that monstrance.

Fr. Allan J. McDonald said...

The monstrance is peculiar. But it finally dawned on me after posting it that it is and artistic attempt at depicting the spinning sun and at Fatima that is a worthy idea but questionably executed. I noticed the outdoor Altar and hanging crucifix to be equally questionable.

John Nolan said...

You wouldn't think, listening to the trite music on offer, that Portugal has a rich heritage of sacred music; the wonderful polyphonic setting of the Crux Fidelis is usually attributed to King John IV, and is still sung on Good Friday wherever a church has a half-decent choir.

I am told that the Portuguese translation of the Mass (which HH pointedly used) is generally regarded as the worst - before 2011 it was the second-worst.

Dialogue said...

Are you sure it's a monstrance? I'm pretty certain it's that thing from the Alien movies.

Theresa McDaniel said...

The monstrance is like no other that I have ever seen. I didn't think it was the sun It looks more like a sunflower. Artistic but very distracting from The Blessed Sacrament. It also looks very difficult to carry and bless the crowd. So many people there. There are people from so far away and they look each one so different.