Tuesday, August 30, 2011

REQUIEM FOR THE LAMEDUCK ENGLISH TRANSLATION OF THE MASS AT SAINT JOESEPH CHURCH, MACON!



Our Bishop-Emeritus J. Kevin Boland has granted St. Joseph Church in Macon permission to implement the people's parts of the new English translation of the Mass beginning the First Sunday in September, this coming Sunday! Last Sunday, August 28 our Masses were kind of a Requiem for a Mass or at least a peculiar English translation from the Latin original that the Vatican allowed over 45 years ago to be an equivalency of the Latin rather than a more literal version of it. Even the higher ups in the Vatican, the pope too, began to realize that allowing for equivalency in translating the original Latin had been an awful mistake (and that takes humility for the Vatican to do) and led translators to change in very subtle and not so subtle ways the spiritual, theological and sometimes doctrinal ethos that is ours in the Latin Rite Mass. They made it into something else altogether different than the reformed Latin Mass.

The new translation while not slavishly literal, is literal enough to maintain our Latin Rite Mass spirituality, theology and doctrinal purity not to mention devotional ethos. That is very good, in fact it is excellent!

In our "Requiem Masses" on Sunday we did not:

1. wear black vestments
2. canonize the old English version that we funeralized
3. Sing "On Eagle's Wings," "Be Not Afraid," hold hands and sing "Kumbaya," or "I Am the Bread of Life"

We did celebrate the 22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time by saying and singing the black and doing the red and reminded our well-catechized parish after the prayer after Holy Communion about the new and improved English translation we will begin using on Labor Day Weekend.

I DID NOT SEE ANY TEARS BEING SHED!

20 comments:

Anonymous said...

Are we still going to shake hands during the Liturgy of the Eucharist?

Frajm said...

Yes, it is still a part of the Liturgy, although no one is forced to shake anyone's hand, just as no one is forced to respond, singing or speaking. When we look to Rome and the Holy Father, it is offered at every Papal Mass in St. Peter's and elsewhere. So yes, we will continue this custom.

pinanv525 said...

In the spirit of Vat II, why not just go all the way and do high fives...I cannot abide that sign of peace stuff. But, I know many of the people around me, and I do not want to appear unfriendly, so I take part. Perhaps a word from the Priest might help...you know like, "Those around you who continue to look forward with their hands in an attitude of prayer are not being anti-social. They are merely attempting to set an example of reverence and humility before the Sacred Host and the Holy Mass. Those of you who prefer a lodge atmosphere may continue your shallow and perfunctory amenities. Sock hop after Mass in the gym."

Anonymous said...

I don't have a problem with it per se. However the timing is just awkward. It is during the most important part of the Mass. Why not before the procession? or during the presentation of the gifts.

Frajm said...

Early in the pontificate of Pope Benedict, there was talk that it be moved to the time before the Offering of the Gifts. In fact the Anglican Use Liturgy allows for this option and I think the Ambrosian Rite does too. In the Latin Rite, even in the EF form of the Solemn High Mass (with deacon and subdeacon) the sign is peace is where it is in the OF Mass, except it is exchanged only by the celebrant and the deacon, sub deacon. The OF Mass simply extended that to the laity, but it should be a sober thing, not a greeting, but that we are at peace with one another as a foretaste of the heavenly banquet.

pinanv525 said...

A sober thing? I have seen young couples give wet, open-mouthed kisses and pats on the bottom. Please...together with the attire of some of these kids at Mass, I am reminded of our
old drive-in movie make out derbys. Now, that was a party...!!

Templar said...

Father, according to the announcements at Mass Sunday, we will be returning to the distribution of Communion under both species? Pray, please tell us why? This was one of the best changes you had brought to St. Joseph, why go back to the common cup of saliva? (and the extra 4 or 6 EMHCs this will require at every Sunday Mass)

And I sincerely hope the answer is not becasue people asked for it. People have been asking for kneelers for Communion too without result (and that by the way is also modeled at every Papal Mass I might add).

Anonymous said...

It would be nice to see the hand shake addressed and dignified in some way. We do it both before the procession and during the Liturgy.

Father, I expect the Bishop had to grant the permission in the same manner a parent has to let an excited child open a birthday present! LOL!!

rcg

Frajm said...

Communion from the Chalice is completely optional for the communicant. Even when no kneeler is provided, a communicant can still kneel and many do as you know, but when no chalice is provided, how can those who the Church indeed allows this option receive?

pinanv525 said...

I'm with Templar. Why bring back an unnecessary complication? I thought it was a real step in the right direction when we began receiving in only one kind.

Frajm said...

Many would say, priests included, why complicate the Mass schedule with the EF Mass? Because it is now allowed!

qwikness said...

Are churches in other non-english speaking countries having a reform of the reform of their liturgies? Or was the English Mass the most in need of it?

Frajm said...

I believe other language groups have to update their Roman Missals too. The Spanish ones have always been the most faithful to the original Latin. The worst offenders are the English and Portuguese. The Vatican has been most concerned that the English be corrected first as English has defacto become the standard language of the world and often people of other language groups are translating into their language from the English, not the Latin.

Anonymous said...

"It may be stated as a general fact, that down to the twelfth century, in the West as well as in the East, public Communion in the churches was ordinarily administered and received under both kinds. That such was the practice in Apostolic times is implied in 1 Corinthians 11:28 (see above), nor does the abbreviated reference to the "breaking of bread" in the Acts of the Apostles (ii, 46) prove anything to the contrary."
- Catholic Encyclopedia

For 12 centuries communion under both kinds was the norm. Is 12 centuries of common practice an "unnecessary complication"?

Another worthy and wholly traditional practice returns to its proper place.

Frajm said...

I often say too that if you want to know what was practiced in antiquity and continues to be done so today to look at the Eastern Orthodox or the Eastern Rite Churches. They've always required Holy Communion under both "Kinds" although the Orthodox and Eastern Rite do so by placing the consecrated levened Bread into the chalice and administering Holy Communion with a spoon. They also normally stand to receive Holy Communion. The West reoriented things over the course of the centuries, often because of internal issues, and the Protestant Reformation which did not effect the Orthodox or Eastern Rites to the extent that it did the Latin Rite or Western Rite. Also, the West has a more highly developed theology of the Reserved Sacrament, including Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament whereas the East does not, although the sacrament is reserved for the sick, but normally no outward signs of reverence are accorded the Sacrament in their tabernacle, more reverence is accorded the icons.

Templar said...

Father, you ask how can the Laity receive under both kinds without the Chalice when you already know the answer (and have successfully availed yourself of it): Intinction. It's permissable, right, proper and dignified, and can be done without the addition of a platoon of EMHCs.

Anonymous said...

I am not against 'complications' as allowable alternatives, but sometimes it is only a complication. I respectfully recommend that a simple, single, process be set in place and that you continue your excellent catechises by incrementally introducing alternative actions, perhaps for special occasions, when allowed. this seems to be what you have done with your 'orientation' to the EF and the new translations. It is going to be very confusing for many people as it is. Make your change all at once, and exhibit alternative actions after a time to adjust.

rcg

pinanv525 said...

Anon, So, what happened after the twelfth century?

Anonymous said...

www.newadvent.org/cathen/04175a.htm

Jake said...

Father.

Please don't take this as shameless self promotion. I rarely leae links to my own stuff on others' posts. Nevertheless, I found a kindred spirit of sort in your comparison of the passing texts to a funeral. Way back in Novembernwhen I began my series on the new translation, I made the very same analogy. If you are interested ..

http://causafinitaest.blogspot.com/2010/11/funeral-of-sorts-every-sunday-for-next.html

Blessings to you,

Jake